Facilities
Sappi Limited last week approved a range of projects in Europe and the United States, including a US$165 million capital project to expand Sappi North America's manufacturing capabilities. The purpose of the investment on Paper Machine No. 1 at its Somerset Mill in Skowhegan, Maine, is to provide flexibility in the production of paper-based packaging products.

At the same time, the US$165 million project in Maine aims to maintain Sappi's position in the graphic paper market, increasing annual production capacity at this mill to almost one million tons per annum. The Paper Machine No. 1 project, which is scheduled to come online in early in 2018, will provide an 180,000 metric ton capacity increase

“This move complements our long term 2020Vision strategy, which seeks opportunities to substantially increase our group EBITDA,” said Steve Binnie, CEO of Sappi Limited.

Sappi is one of the world’s largest producers of diversified woodfibre products, focused on converting wood pulp, paper pulp and paper-based products to direct and indirect customers in over 160 countries. Headquartered in Johannesburg, South Africa, Sappi has more than 13,000 employees and manufacturing operations on three continents in seven countries and group sales of US$6 billion.

Sappi North America, headquartered in Boston, generates revenue for its parent company through four business units, including high quality Coated Printing Papers, Specialised Cellulose, Release Papers and Specialty Packaging. “Somerset's existing world class infrastructure together with its talented workforce and access to high quality fiber makes the mill an excellent and obvious choice for this investment," said Mark Gardner, President and CEO of Sappi North America. “Increasing our flexibility and expanding the paper mill's capability and capacity will ensure that we continue to make superior products at Somerset for years to come.”
Informco of Scarborough, Ontario, is one of eight printing operations from around the world chosen by Kodak to receive its 2016 Sonora Plate Green Leaf Award. The program, which first launched in 2014, recognizes customers who have demonstrated outstanding efforts to reduce their environmental impact through a variety of initiatives and best practices.  

All of the printers are users of Kodak Sonora process-free plates, which hold a range of environmentally progressive benefits, while also being judged on practices like monitoring of energy and water usage, participation in local community sustainability programs and the use of eco-conscious materials and supplies. Sonora plates remove the need for the plate processor, which requires chemicals, water, and energy while generating waste. Kodak predicts that 30 percent of its plate volume will be process-free by 2019.

“It’s an honour to select eight of our customers to receive this prestigious award. Printers around the world continue to see the real benefits that sustainable printing practices deliver to their bottom lines,” said Richard Rindo, Kodak’s General Manager, WW Offset Print, and Vice President, Print Systems Division.

Founded 65 years ago, Informco provides integrated communications solutions – design, print and distribution – to clients across a range of industries. In presenting the award to the company, Kodak explains, that for over 18 years, Informco has integrated active environmental practices into its day-to-day operations – “ISO-certified since 1999, the company has made significant reductions in energy usage, water consumption, and VOC emissions through rigorous monitoring programs.” Kodak also notes Informco was the first printer in Canada to win the Canadian Council of the Ministers of the Environment Pollution Prevention Award in 2002.              

The seven remaining 2016 Sonora Plate Green Leaf Award include: Reynolds and Reynolds (United States), Groupe Estimprim (France), Royalpack (Poland), UVO communication (South Africa), Ohshaika Printing (Japan), Kava Printing (China), and NPE Print Communications (Singapore).
The British Columbia Institute of Technology, based in Burnaby, BC, received a software donation from Aleyant, which provided the school’s Graphic Communications Technology Management (GTEC) program with both Aleyant Pressero and eDocBuilder for its Web-to-print curriculum.

“We are very lucky to have the full support of the local printing industry and industry suppliers for our institution, and our thanks go out to Aleyant for their generosity in donating this software,” said Wayne Collins, who leads the GTEC program and is its only full-time employee.

“Our unique model at this polytechnic institution started by partnering with the BCPIA industry association to seek high-level managers as instructors, who typically teach one class per term,” continued Collins. “This keeps our curriculum current, and what we really deliver is a two-year diploma that trains entry-level managers into the industry. It’s like a two-year job interview.”

Aleyant’s donation includes both the software and student access to the company’s online training videos. “Our students have a lot to accomplish over a 14-week course, and assigning them videos to watch as homework helped boost the course content.”

BCIT’s most recent GTEC Web-to-print course was taught by MET Fine Printers manager Steve Tomljanovic, and students have already been using Aleyant Pressero’s Web-to-print tool and its eDocBuilder variable data tool to create Websites and documents, which are then used to produce their products in a production lab with electrophotographic, inkjet, offset and flexo presses.

In addition to document creation and production, Collins explains he plans to investigate adding curriculum around pricing tables and their connection to MIS, as well as other aspects of advanced Web-to-print solutions to round out the student experience.

“If a group of students just coming into the industry can get the tools, use them that quickly and develop the kinds of products our students produced,” he said, “I am confident they will be well-prepared to join a company upon graduation and get a profitable Web-to-print operation up and running right away.”
In January 2017, Xaar plc, a world leader in the development of industrial inkjet technologies, is set to open its Xaar 3D Centre in Nottingham, United Kingdom. The new facility is engineered to deliver 3D printing services and equipment to OEMs, material suppliers and end users. Xaar’s new 3D team is headed up by Professor Neil Hopkinson, who joined the company in March 2016 to develop its 3D business.

With 19 years of experience in additive manufacturing technology, Hopkinson is the inventor of High Speed Sintering (HSS) technology, which uses inkjet print heads and infrared heaters to manufacture products layer by layer from polymer powder materials at much higher speeds than other additive manufacturing processes. HSS is of interest to companies looking to use 3D in volume manufacturing.  

In 2016, Hopkinson was scheduled to complete a three-year project to develop supply chain and full-scale production capabilities for novel additive manufacturing technologies for applications in major industrial sectors through three key partners, including Unilever (FMCG), BAE Systems (aerospace) and Cobham Technical Services (space and communications). Xaar’s role in this project focused on optimizing the performance of specialist third-party fluids in combination with its print heads.

The expansion of Xaar’s 3D business is a key part of the company’s 2020 strategic vision. Since joining Xaar, Hopkinson has been building his 3D team and in early 2016 appointed project managers and 3D engineers who are now based at the Xaar 3D Centre. The team in Nottingham will focus on the development of materials and applications with a range of global brand partners.  

In addition, the Xaar 3D team this month been expanded to include an experienced group of engineers working in Copenhagen, Denmark. The Xaar Copenhagen team will provide design and process development expertise to help the company’s partners commercialize HSS equipment.
 
“I am delighted to confirm our investment in the Xaar 3D Centre in Nottingham and our 3D team including the new group in Copenhagen,” said Neil Hopkinson. “As we build our business in 3D it is vital that we have the in-house expertise to support our partners. The addition of the team in Denmark further extends our capability.”
Canon Canada at the start of December hosted a couple dozen journalists for a 2-hour tour of its new 180,000-square-foot headquarters in Brampton, Ontario, home to the company’s domestic business interests in consumer, medical, security and print-production imaging.

Built on more than 18 acres, the open, Kyosei-inspired interior of building is highlighted by a 5,000-square-foot interactive space that showcases the past, present and future of Canon innovation. From Canon cameras, printers and projectors to medical imaging equipment, copiers and production systems, the showroom will house the newest Canon products for customers and prospective customers. The company’s printing technologies occupy the majority of space in the showroom, including systems like the imagePRESS 10000VP and Oce VarioPRint 6320 Ultra+.

While print-production remains a major pillar of Canon’s business, second only to the company’s historic consumer-imaging sector, the new Canadian headquarters is designed to support its growing interests in both security and medical imaging systems. In 2014, Canon surprised the security industry with its acquisition of Milestone Systems, one of the world’s leading providers of video management software, and then in February 2015 spent approximately $2.8 billion to acquire security-systems giant Axis Communications.

Located at the corner of Mississauga Road and Steeles Avenue West, the new building brings together more than 400 Canon employees who will play a major role in driving the company’s diverse imaging interests across Canada.
Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG today launched its new development centre project at the company’s Wiesloch-Walldorf site in Germany. Targeting a completion date for 2018, the centre will be home to 1,000 workers in what Heidelberg projects will become the world’s most state-of-the-art research facility for the printing industry.

The company unveiled its development centre plans in the presence of its new CEO, Rainer Hundsdörfer, and Theresia Bauer, Minister of Science, Research and the Arts for the German state of Baden-Württemberg. Heidelberg is investing some €50 million ($72 million Canadian) in this new innovation hub for an industry that, according to the press maker, has a global annual turnover of around €400 billion.

“This investment represents a new beacon in Baden-Württemberg’s research landscape,” said Bauer. “Building a development center of this size and quality proves that Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG bases its decisions on a long-term strategy and makes the future worth looking forward to.”

Heidelberg explains, despite a difficult economic situation in recent years, the company at no time cut its research budget, focusing instead on developing new, innovative products and services.

“We deliberately chose Baden-Württemberg because it combines an excellent environment with highly qualified experts,” said Hundsdörfer. “A highly modern and future-oriented working environment will be created in Wiesloch-Walldorf, designed to support interdisciplinary and cross-functional development processes.”

The printing industry now requires new applications and control technologies, explained the company in relation to the creation of its new centre, in addition to the ongoing development of traditional offset and digital printing technologies. Heidelberg also points to  printing on three-dimensional objects made from all kinds of materials, enabling the customized printing of glass, wood, plastic, and other materials.

Heidelberg noted, as an indication of its continuing transformation, that there are now more than 250 software specialists working for the company. The company has also started employing chemists, for example, for developing and producing its own environmentally progress inks for new applications.

“The example of Heidelberg is demonstrating that even a large company can reinvent itself,” said Bauer.
Seiko Epson Corporation held a ceremony to launch the construction of a new factory at its Hirooka Office in Shiojiri, Japan. The factory, which is scheduled to begin operations in the first half of the 2018 fiscal year, will produce the company’s PrecisionCore print heads, the core devices in Epson's inkjet printers.

Epson will conduct R&D and focus on production engineering at the facility, which, in the future, will roughly triple Epson's current print head production capacity.

Initially launched in October 2010, sales of PrecisionCore print heads had reached as many as 15 million units worldwide as of June 2016. In the commercial and industrial sectors, Epson expects to see an accelerating shift from traditional analogue printing to inkjet printing solutions in areas such as signage, textiles and product labels.

Epson’s Hirooka Office works closely with its production sites worldwide. The investment in the new factory is part of Epson's plans to further reinforce its R&D and production platform through the 2020 fiscal year.

Epson’s inkjet-based printing solutions business leverages original Micro Piezo inkjet technology for home, office, commercial, and industrial markets. The new factory will handle the front-end manufacturing process for PrecisionCore print heads, high-capacity ink tank printers, and commercial and industrial printers.
After receiving a $500,000 grant from New York State’s Higher Education Capital Matching Grant Program in early 2016, the Rochester Institute of Technology has officially opened its 3,200-square-foot Additive Manufacturing and Multifunctional Printing (AMPrint) Center, located on the school’s Henrietta campus. The facility is described as being among the first research labs in the world to focus on development of next-generation multi-functional 3D printing technologies, materials and devices.

Denis Cormier, an expert in 3D print technologies, is Director of RIT’s AMPrint Center and the Earl W. Brinkman Professor in RIT’s Kate Gleason College of Engineering. A professor of industrial engineering, Cormier’s research focus is in printed electronics, specifically the synthesis of printable nano-inks, the development or enhancement of printing processes, and the design of novel printed electronic devices.

Cormier was the original principal investigator for the Center and brought together university partners from Clarkson University and SUNY New Paltz with corporate partners that include Xerox, GE Research, Corning, Kodak and MakerBot, to design novel devices and develop next generation polymer, metal and composite technologies.

The centre will serve as both a research and teaching facility for the university’s students as well as its corporate partners. Researchers will have access to functional 3D printing and fusing equipment, direct-write printing equipment, analogue printing and surface metrology technologies. Also included will be wet-chemistry infrastructure necessary to synthesize printable nano-materials.

Michelle Cometa of RIT produced an online article about the opening of the new facility, which included the partipation of New York’s Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul.
Mimaki last week opened up its first Canadian location in Toronto, Ontario, with a traditional Kagami Biraki ceremony to acknowledge the imaging company’s headquartered roots in Japan.

Mimaki USA, a leading manufacturer of wide-format inkjet printers and cutters, today celebrated the opening of its new Toronto Branch, the company’s first in Canada and seventh in North America. A grand opening event was held on October 11, 2016.

The highlight of a Kagami Biraki ceremony culminates with the lid of a sake barrel being broken open by a wooden mallet and the sake is served to everyone present. Mimaki explains the ceremony represents an opening to harmony and good fortune.

Located at the intersection of Jane Street and Highway 7 in Toronto, Mimaki’s new Canadian location includes a technology centre, Mimaki’s seventh such centre in North America, for running demonstrations of its wide-format imaging technologies.

Lucas Crossley, Canada Sales Manager for Mimaki, will lead the new Canadian location, which will include trained sales, support and service staff to help support its dealers across the country. The 11,000-square-foot technology centre will also hold Dealer Technician Certification courses in addition to applications training for clients.
Agfa Graphics announced today that it plans to close down its factory in Vallese, Italy, one of its seven printing plate manufacturing sites worldwide. This facility, which the company describes as being a small operations relative to its other plate plants, produces lithographic aluminum printing plates for offset presses.

Agfa explained these product lines have been facing a weaker market demand, primarily in Europe, for several years.

“This decision is part of our global streamlining plan to reduce our manufacturing capacity and to improve the cost structure of our printing plate business,” said Stefaan Vanhooren, President of Agfa Graphics. “This is necessary to remain the leading company in an extremely competitive prepress business amid global economic uncertainty.”

Agfa has informed all employees about its intention to close the Vallese facility, impacting 120 employee positions.
Agfa Graphics announced today that it plans to close down its factory in Vallese, Italy, one of its seven printing plate manufacturing sites worldwide. This facility, which the company describes as being a small operations relative to its other plate plants, produces lithographic aluminum printing plates for offset presses.

Agfa explained these product lines have been facing a weaker market demand, primarily in Europe, for several years.

“This decision is part of our global streamlining plan to reduce our manufacturing capacity and to improve the cost structure of our printing plate business,” said Stefaan Vanhooren, President of Agfa Graphics. “This is necessary to remain the leading company in an extremely competitive prepress business amid global economic uncertainty.”

Agfa has informed all employees about its intention to close the Vallese facility, impacting 120 employee positions.
Mary Laschinger, Chairman and CEO of Veritiv Corporation, today spent her morning in Mississauga, Ontario, to help celebrate the ongoing construction of a new 450,000-square-foot facility that will become the company’s new Canadian headquarters.

Based in Atlanta, Georgia, Laschinger was then on her way to New York to present Veritiv’s quarterly financial results. Veritiv recently broke into the Fortune 500 club and its Canadian operation, explained Laschinger, now represents about seven percent of the company’s total annual revenues.

“Bringing together Veritiv’s Toronto area team in this new, state-of-the art facility in Mississauga is an important strategic investment for our company, and it aligns with one of our business goals to integrate our operations and strengthen collaboration throughout our organization,” said Laschinger. “Canada is an important market for Veritiv, and we are delighted to renew our commitment to this city and accelerate our growth across the country.”

Jason Alderman, Regional Vice President for Veritiv, who leads the Canadian operation, welcomed a range of special guests to a small stage protected from the blazing sun by a tent. Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie also spoke at the official groundbreaking ceremony, applauding Veritiv’s project and noting Mississauga has become Canada’s sixth largest city with a population of close to 800,000 and home to some 8,300 businesses.

Located just off the 401 at Hurontario (125 Madill Boulevard), in the growing business area of Courtney Park, now home to some of Canada’s largest industrial facilities, the new Veritiv building is scheduled to be complete by around April 2017 with move-in planned for shortly after.

“This new facility will enable Veritiv to expand our service capabilities for Canadian customers and increase the company’s operational efficiencies by consolidating our three existing facilities in the Greater Toronto Area,” said Alderman. “The City of Mississauga also offers many strategic advantages to our operations, our customers, and our employees.”

The new Veritiv facility, which is to house around 350 employees, will include approximately 410,000 square feet of warehouse space and another 42,000 square feet of office space. In Canada, Veritiv employs approximately 950 people and has a fleet of around 115 tractor-trailer units, and a network of 17 warehouses. Alderman explains there are no plans to close facilities outside of the three GTA locations being consolidated in Mississauga, because the other locations are a critical part of Veritiv’s national reach.

Veritiv Corporation, headquartered in Atlanta, has approximately 180 distribution centres throughout the U.S., Mexico and Canada, and employs approximately 8,800 people.
Fujifilm, which has long held a commitment to internal green energy and carbon reduction targets, is now running its primary production facility in Tilburg, the Netherlands, with 100 percent wind energy. The Tilburg plant manufactures a number of Fujifilm products, including printing plates.

“Our motto is that if we can do it green, we will do it green,” says Tillburg site Director, Peter Struik. “With that objective in mind we have come to an agreement with our energy supplier Eneco to provide us with 100 percent renewable energy. They share our commitment to green energy, and with their help and expertise we have been able to make this vision a reality.”

The facility had been partially powered by wind since 2011 when Fujifilm began working in partnership with Dutch energy supplier Eneco. The wind turbines that drive the plant’s manufacturing capability are located on-site and in nearby Zeeland. The 100 gigawatt hours of energy these two sites generate for the Fujifilm facility is enough to power 30,000 homes.

“Fujifilm is showing commendable courage and leadership in having taken this bold step,” said Eneco board member, Marc van der Linden. “They are setting an excellent example to their industry and to other businesses in the surrounding area. Like Eneco, Fujifilm is a forward-thinking company which recognizes that economy and ecology have to go hand in hand.”

Fujifilm and Eneco are now investigating the possibility of producing bio-mass steam on the Fujifilm site.
Sun Chemical has opened a new coatings lab in its Carlstadt, New Jersey, research and development facility. The lab is the fourth of its kind worldwide, joining similar laboratories located in the United Kingdom and DIC R&D centres in Japan.

The 11,000-square-foot investment by Sun Chemical holds what the company describes as state-of-the-art equipment and analytical support for studying migration, adhesion, permeability, and other performance-related coating phenomena.

The lab will use systems like SEM microscopy, atomic force microscopy, IR surface mapping, and surface energy measurement, among other techniques, to advance the fundamental understanding of key coatings performance attributes.

A variety of equipment has been added to the new lab, including: gas transmission rate analyzers, glass bottle testing instrumentation, and coatings spraying equipment to develop new and improved water, solvent, and energy curable primers, inks, and coatings. A lab laminator will be added in 2017 to help study the interaction between ink, substrate, primers, overprint varnishes and laminating adhesives.   

“The new Carlstadt coatings lab represents a major investment in our coatings business,” said Russell Schwartz, Chief Technology Officer, Sun Chemical. “This enhanced capability will help us expand our product range offerings into an evolving packaging market that includes laminating adhesives, glass decoration, and printed electronics.

“The integration of coatings technology with ink, polymer, and functional materials development within the same technical organization and facility transcends product lines and geographical barriers,” continued Schwartz. “It will also help expand Sun Chemical’s Advanced Materials portfolio into industrial coatings applications.”

Sun Chemical holds the capability to develop and test water, solvent, and energy curable coatings, including primers, overprints and materials in order to provide enhanced functionality, such as barrier properties. “While many companies rely on commercially available polymers, Sun Chemical differentiates itself by developing proprietary polymers targeted for our specific industry and products,” said Bob O’Boyle, Product Manager, Coatings, Sun Chemical. “We’re also focusing on smart coatings for sensor-enabled application equipment.”
Boston Globe Media Partners announced the sale of the current headquarters for its Boston Globe newspaper operations, which have been housed for 58 years in Dorchester, Massachusetts. The purchaser of the 16.5-acre property and 815,000-square-foot building has not yet been named under a confidentiality agreement.

The Globe’s editorial and business departments will move to a new office complex less than a mile from the publisher’s founding location on Newspaper Row, where the paper operated from its inception in 1872 until moving to Dorchester in 1958.

In mid-2015, the Globe announced it had purchased a building in a Taunton industrial park for just over US$20 million that would serve as its newspaper printing plant starting in early 2017. The move to a new printing plant was well underway before the sale of its Dorchester sale.

The new 328,000-square-foot printing plant, according to an article in the Globe, will also print the Boston Herald, The New York Times, and other newspapers that hire the new operation to do their production.

An article by Beth Healy in 2015 explains the Globe’s printing operation — including press operators, mailers, and drivers — includes roughly 1,000 people, which accounted for slightly more than half of all of the company’s employees.

New York Times Co. sold the Boston Globe in 2013 to Red Sox owner John W. Henry for US$70 million. Times Co. purchased the Boston Globe in 1993 from the Taylor family for US$1.1 billion.
Page 1 of 6

Subscription Centre

 
New Subscription
 
Already a Subscriber
 
Customer Service
 
View Digital Magazine Renew

Most Popular

Latest Events

Dscoop Phoenix
Wed Mar 01, 2017
Ryerson GCM Job Fair
Thu Mar 23, 2017 @ 4:00pm -
Graphics Canada 2017
Thu Apr 06, 2017
Inkjet Summit
Mon Apr 24, 2017
FTA 2017 INFO*FLEX
Sun Apr 30, 2017
Grafik’ Art
Fri May 12, 2017