Howard Iron Works Dedicates Upton Library

PrintAction Staff
January 06, 2017
By PrintAction Staff
Family and friends of the late Tim Upton, who passed away in October 2015 at age 83 after a storied career as one of Canadian printing’s best-known technology leaders, gathered in mid-December at Howard Graphic Equipment’s new facility in Mississauga, Ontario, to inaugurate a new library in his honour.

Helen Upton, daughters Julie and Heather, son Anthony, their spouses and grandchildren, were joined by printing-industry leaders from the past and present for the Timothy O. Upton Library dedication.

The Upton Library is part of the Howard Iron Works Museum (www.howardironworks.org), run by Nick and Liana Howard. The museum focuses on the preservation and history of the printing industry, restoring and showcasing machinery with a specific focus on the years 1830 to 1950. The Upton Library is the centre point of the facility and holds over 1,000 books dedicated to the printing art and its technology.

Upton spent his working life in the graphic arts. In 1959, he emigrated from Britain to Canada and went to work for Sears Ltd., which represented several leading printing and bindery brands with offices across Canada. He eventually moved to Edmonton as a Branch Manager for Sears, followed by a posting in London, Ontario, before arriving in Toronto as Vice President of Sales for Sears.

In 1984, Upton continued his career with the newly minted Heidelberg Canada in the role of Senior Vice President of Sales, where he remained until 1994, before spending his final 10 working years with Howard Graphic Equipment Ltd. Founded in 1967, Howard Graphic Equipment provides pre-owned late model machinery to the graphic arts, conducting business in over 74 countries across the globe.

“Tim was prompt: Do not ever be late, because he never was. Do not make silly excuses because Tim never did. Be honest, truthful – even if it hurts. I knew my place and it was firmly two steps back of Tim most of the time. Of all the salespeople I have known, Tim was the best – bar none. Why? Because he was real,” wrote Nick Howard upon Upton’s passing.

“He never played games, sucked up to ownership or thought of anyone as being better than himself. Tim’s nickname The Bulldog is fitting,” continued Howard. “One might assume it came from his rugby days, but, no, Tim was just a selfless and tireless man, who, as Churchill once said, never gave up.”

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