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Most Influential Printer 2010 – Group C


July 14, 2010
By Jon Robinson

CANADA’S MOST INFLUENTIAL PRINTER 2010:
GROUP C CANDIDATES

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COMMERCIAL PRINTING

Dick Kouwenhoven     PA50 2010 #3 ranking
President & CEO
Hemlock Printers

Burnaby, BC

Founding Hemlock in 1968, Kouwenhoven is arguably the most-respected commercial printer in Canada, based largely on decades of technological innovation and the company’s committed stance on environmental progress. With around 185 employees operating out of a 80,000-square-foot plant and generating sales in excess of $40 million, Hemlock produces the majority of its offset work at well over 400-line screen, while also innovating toner-based production. The company has won more than 20 Benny Awards.

Related links:
Hemlock Sustainability Report 2009
FSC Canada   Recent board member
Premier Print Awards (The Bennys)  Perennial winner/second most Canadian wins
Sappi Printer of the Year   Past & current winner

COMMERCIAL PRINTING

Peter Cober
President
Cober Printing
Kitchener, ON

Heavily involved in the OPIA and SWOB for years, Cober runs a highly respected, 4th-generation company and continually invests in new technologies for both offset and toner.

Related links:
OPIA & SWOB-OPIA   Perennial support/involvement
OPIA Government Affairs   Committee member

COMMERCIAL PRINTING

Jean Deschamps
President & CEO
J.B. Deschamps
Quebec, QC

With a 3rd-generation company, in business for over 80 years, Deschamps leads a large regional organization self-described as the leading security printer in Quebec.

Related link:
Corporate video

 
COMMERCIAL PRINTING

Marc Fortier
President
TI Group
East York, ON

After modernizing PLM Group and Transcontinental Yorkville, Fortier now leads a diversified company with creative support, premedia, DAM, finishing and 40-inch printing.

Related link:
Custom Data Imaging   Pioneering VDP division (purchased in 2009)

TRADE PRINTING

Dennis Low
President
Point One Graphics
Etobicoke, ON

In just over 15 years, Low built one of Toronto’s most-formidable trade printers, with five Heidelberg presses and a manroland web in a 70,000-square-foot plant.

Related link:
Production strength