Digital Finishing
Duplo USA Corporation has announced the launch of its DDC-810 Digital Spot UV Coater.

The DDC-810 utilizes inkjet technology and gives images depth and raised textures with a gloss varnish. It features a CCD camera recognition system ensuring image-to-image registration and PC Controller software. The DDC-810 is designed for short-run applications. It can process up to 21 sheets per minute (A3) and paper weights from 157 to 450 gsm (coated paper).

Anthony Gandara, project manager at Duplo USA, says the DDC-810 is for printers who want to “add elevated spot UV embellishment to their products."
Zünd has introduced what it describes as robust routing option, called the RM-L router, for working with heavy-duty materials like acrylics, plexiglass, aluminums, polycarbonates, Dibond, Forex, and MDF. The spindle delivers 3.6 kW of processing power and is well suited for print service providers running diverse work that is typically processed via different tools.

In response to this ever-growing application range, Zünd’s new RM-L system is capable of routing, engraving and polishing a range of materials with what the company describes as a powerful spindle with pneumatic collet.  With a maximum torque of 0.7 Nm, in addition to 3.6 kW of power, the tool allows for dense, hard materials to be processed at greater speeds and cutting depths. It essenetially reduces the number of passes required to increase throughput.

The RM-L spindle is water-cooled for run longevity and uses what Zünd describes as a high-performance dust extraction system to keep the working area clean. The new router module is equipped with MQL, a minimal quantity lubrication system that keeps the bit lubricated to minimize friction. As a result, Zünd explains very little heat is generated during routing, which can affect bit life. This lubrication system also allows for greater acceleration and processing speeds.

The technology relies on a surface compensation system to determine the thickness of materials and detect inconsistencies. During processing, the system compensates for any variances by making the necessary depth adjustments. Particularly for engraving applications, Zünd explains this prevents quality issues arising from differences in material thickness by maintaining constant routing depths.

The system uses a ER-16 collet for concentricity and to maintain reliable retention. To accommodate different shaft diameters, HSK-E25 collet holders are used, which allows for the use of a wider range of bits with one and the same router module. The ARC HSK automatic tool changer of the system takes care of handling and changing router bits. The magazine can accommodate up to eight different preloaded collet holders.
Sydney Stone, which specializes in distributing and servicing short-run finishing systems, is introducing two new Morgana products into the Canadian marketplace. As Morgana’s distribution partner for the country, Sydney Stone is launching Morgana’s next generation DigiFold Pro 385 and AutoCreaser Pro 385 systems.

One of the key changes from previous DigiFold models, explains Sydney Stone, is the introduction of a high-capacity vacuum top-feeder that can take a sheet pile of over 17.7 inches. The company continues to explain after the size and thickness of stock are entered, all other feeder functions including air and vacuum settings, side guide positions, and fold roller gaps are automatically adjusted for easy setup of jobs. Stock of up to 0.4mm can be creased and folded with virtually no cracking of the sheets or the toner on them.

Another new feature is the dual creasing blades, the Morgana DynaCrease, for creasing and folding applications at over 6,000 sheets per hour, and one for “creasing only mode,” allowing for a range of applications to be produced on one machine.

The AutoCreaser, according to Hillhouse, is still Morgana’s best-selling machine and he expects further adoption with the new Pro 385 aimed at higher volume applications as a heavier duty machine. “Some of our customers had been using the previous generation machines for longer runs of offset or digital work, this new model will enable them to load the pile feeder and let the machine run,” said Michael Steele, Managing Director of Sydney Stone. “The high level of automation here is going to greatly benefit business owners with a goal of maximizing efficiency while producing output of unparalleled quality.”
MGI Digital Technology has debuted what the company describes as a major new addition to its JETvarnish 3D digital enhancement product portfolio. The JETvarnish 3D Evolution is also described by the company as the world’s first B1 scalable sheetfed Digital Enhancement Press.

JETvarnish 3D Evolution features a modular architecture, digital foiling and an upgradeable inkjet expansion system with three available substrate size options: 52 x 120 cm (20 x 47 inches) 64 x 120 cm (25 x 47 inches) and 75 x 120 cm (29 x 47 inches).

The B1+ size format option (75 x 120 cm, 29 x 47 inches), explains MGI, is designed to give printers and converters the ability to run fully personalized short, medium and long runs in a “die-less” manner for packaging applications. Every piece finished on all of MGI’s JETvarnish 3D systems can include a blend of digitally embellished images, text, data and brand designs using spot varnish, 3D raised varnish and digitally embossed foil in one pass.

The JETvarnish 3D Evolution is a high-production technology that incorporates pallet stacking, automated inkjet head cleaning, a new automatic feeding system, as well as a new sheet registration system, all of which will be unveiled and launched at drupa 2016.
Scodix plans to demonstration nine different print enhancement applications at the 2016 Dscoop Conference of HP technology users, running from April 14 to 16 in San Antonio, Texas. This will include the global introduction of two new techniques called Scodix Crystals and Scodix Cast&Cure, as well as the option of producing Foil on Foil, through the Scodix Ultra Pro system.

Scodix Crystals – with colourful and reflective sparkle – is designed to replace the manual placement of chaton, costume jewelry, or crystals on products such as greeting cards and brochures. Scodix explains it creates a true 3D dimensional effect by applying a multi-layer, receding pyramid-like build-up of polymer to printed projects.

Scodix Cast&Cure, applied through the Scodix Foil Station, is designed to create a 3D holographic effect on print projects. Employing a variety of standard off-the-shelf holographic patterns, as well as customized designs, Scodix explains this new technique also adds security features to brochures, folding boxes and packaging, displays, book covers, and all types of bags.

The remaining print enhancement applications including Scodix Sense, Foil, Spot, Metallic, Glitter, VDP/VDE, and Braille.
The JM55 Force is a new JetMounter model to be added to Drytac’s line up of wide-format roller laminators. Described as a heavy-duty, entry-level laminator, the JM55 Force is designed for users who require durability and functionality over the long-term.  

The JM55 Force has a maximum laminating width of 55 inches (1,397 mm) and is described as being well suited for mounting, laminating and decaling pressure sensitive materials. It features large 4.7 inch (119.4 mm) diameter non-stick rollers; speed control up to 20 feet (six metres) per minute; a maximum nip opening of 1 inch (25 mm); top and bottom auto-grip supply shafts with brake tension control on the operator side; single mechanical height/pressure adjustment; and an interchangeable 110V or 220V electrical configuration.

“The Force is an excellent option for shops that need the versatility of a heavy-duty machine but want one with a smaller price tag,” said Nate Goodman, Drytac Product Manager. “There is no doubt that the well-built Force will provide many years of service.”
Rotoflex, which manufacturers inspection, slitting, rewinding and die cutting equipment, has released the new HSI slitter rewinder designed for high volume label slitting, inspection and rewinding. It is built with, according to Rotoflex, the same architecture as the company’s flagship VSI vertical design series.

Rotoflex explains features of the new HSI include 330 and 440mm web widths, 1,000 fpm running speed, extra-large inspection table, ergonomic 37 inch (940 mm) high editing area, easily accessible slitting module, a straightforward web path and conveniently located finished roll rewind location. With end-to-end servo control design, the HSI also features the Rotoflex URC 2.0 proprietary control system with simple menus and an intuitive interface, giving operators the ability to monitor all functions from a single screen.
 
The small footprint HSI is configurable for a range of vision inspection solutions and offers options like the new biometric (fingerprint) authentication for operator access and the Rotoflex exclusive Report Management System (RMS). With the RMS tool, real-time production data is collected from multiple finishing machines to a single interface, which can be accessed remotely via computer or handheld device. RMS generates a variety of detailed, customizable reports on performance variables such as run time, defects, production volume and scrap generation, as well as compares outputs of multiple machines.

“Designed with the proven robust construction of our successful VSI series, the HSI is an advantageous solution for converters preferring a horizontal slitting inspection configuration in their off-line finishing machines,” said Manohar Dhugga, Rotoflex director of engineering and service. “The HSI is one of many new Business Responsive Technologies to be unveiled in the next few months, supporting our commitment to deliver high quality, innovative solutions that drive customer profitability."
Goss is launching six new unwinder/splicers and rewinders for its Contiweb product lines to be used with inkjet web presses. Both the unwinder and rewinder series products are engineered to be entirely modular, providing customers the ability to add automation at either end of the press line.

Developed at the Goss Contiweb facility in the Netherlands, which has been producing splicers and dryers for web offset printers for almost 40 years, Goss states the new product lines have been designed to equal its Contiweb splice performance of 99.7 percent but for digital webs.

“After many years refining and perfecting product design to ensure efficiency and repeatable high quality for web offset printers, we’re now seeing a similar need within the digital web community,” said Bert Schoonderbeek, Managing Director at Goss Contiweb. “The increasing variety of installations and applications is creating a relentless demand from print service providers for technologies that advance their competitive edge. The ability to master web tension and to continually improve productivity is rapidly becoming critical to success.”

Available in two web widths, 770 mm (30 inches) and 1100 mm (42 inches), the CD range of splicer/unwinders and the CR range of rewinders share features that facilitate set-up, integration and day-to-day operation. These include floor-level loading and unloading of paper reels; unwinding/rewinding in either direction; and motorized reel side-lay adjustment; all of which can be monitored throughout via an HMI screen on the unit.

Each model is shaftless and uses pneumatically expanding core chucks driven by low-noise electric motors, which provides an added element of sustainability, explains Goss, since energy generated feeds back into the electrical circuit.

The Goss Contiweb CD series of unwinder/splicers are availble with a range of options for additional levels of infeed control, web guidance, remote operation through the central control system, and remote diagnosis via VPN. The Goss Contiweb CR Series of rewinders allow for transfer between reels of different width and paper thickness, and repeated transfers from first to second position, and vice versa.
Sydney Stone is to begin distributing and servicing MOHR paper cutters, made in Germany by Adolf Mohr Maschinenfabrik GmbH, in Canada.

The models carried by Sydney Stone include the MOHR 56, MOHR 66 and MOHR 80 cutters with all units available in the ECO and NET models. Sydney Stone will also be distributing the MOHR BC-330 three-side trimmer, as well as the new DigiCut laser cutter introduced by MOHR earlier this year.

“We pride ourselves on being paper cutter experts for our segment, having supplied for decades the EBA and Challenge brands,” said Michael Steele Director with Sydney Stone, which also distributes Morgana and Duplo technology. “Adding the MOHR line ensures our customers can continue to use us as their businesses grow and evolve."

Sydney Stone is also carrying MOHR parts and supporting the equipment through its technical services team. “We are looking forward working with Sydney Stone on the Canadian market,” said Peder Rejmers, Business Development Manager of Adolf Mohr Maschinenfabrik GmbH. “Their nationwide structure and experience within cutters will certainly benefit both new and old customers.”
Duplo introduced the 600i system as its new high-end collating and booklet-making equipment. The 600i integrates the fully automatic DBM-600 Bookletmaker with high-speed DSC-10/60i suction collators, producing saddle, side, or corner-stitched booklets, as well as letter landscape applications.

The 600i Booklet System can produce up to 5,200 booklets per hour or collate up to 10,000 sets per hour into a stacker. It features PC Controller software, which enables users to operate the entire system from a PC as well as create and save a large number of jobs onto the hard drive for faster changeovers.

“The new 600i Booklet System is our best flat sheet booklet system to date,” said Si Nguyen, VP of Sales at Duplo USA. “Our Duplo engineers went above and beyond to make our flagship booklet system even more reliable while equipped with several new features and technology.”

Duplo explains, by using the standard Intelligent Multi-Bin Feeding (IMBF) feature in the PC Controller software, custom feed applications can be performed and a variety of unique job requirements can be fulfilled.

Users can also customize the 600i system with a variety of options like the DKT-200 two-knife trimmer and gutter cutter for three-side trimming capabilities and 2-up processing.

Duplo released the 600i Booklet System, described by the company as its high-end collating and booklet-making equipment. The 600i integrates the fully automatic DBM-600 Bookletmaker with high-speed DSC-10/60i suction collators, producing saddle, side, or corner-stitched booklets, as well as letter landscape applications.

The 600i can produce up to 5,200 booklets per hour or collate up to 10,000 sets per hour into a stacker. It features PC Controller software, which enables users to operate the entire system from a PC, as well as create and save a large number of jobs onto the hard drive for faster changeovers.

“The new 600i Booklet System is our best flat sheet booklet system to date,” said Si Nguyen, VP of Sales at Duplo USA. “Our Duplo engineers went above and beyond to make our flagship booklet system even more reliable while equipped with several new features and technology.”

Duplo explains, by using the standard Intelligent Multi-Bin Feeding (IMBF) feature in the PC Controller software, custom feed applications can be performed. Users can also customize the 600i system with a variety of options like the DKT-200 two-knife trimmer and gutter cutter for three-side trimming capabilities and 2-up processing.

Esko has unveiled a new range of Kongsberg tools, on top of the more than 100 existing cutting blades, router bits and accessories. Some of the newest tools include a psaligraphy (paper cutting) knife tool, perforation wheel and braille tool. All three tools are available for usage on the Kongsberg XN, Kongsberg V and Kongsberg XL Series of digital finishing systems.

The tables are suitable for packaging, display and signage using a range of substrates like foam, plastics and vinyl to paper, corrugated boards and folding carton.

The new Psaligraphy knife tool is designed to cut out fine details in paper and folding carton. The 60 mm Perforation wheel enables users to create tear and crease-assist perforations in corrugated board up to 4-mm thick at a much higher speed than before. This tool is suited for producing POP-materials and a range of packaging. Prior to this wheel becoming available, Esko explains, it took about 40 seconds to do one metre of a 3x3 perforation pattern (3 mm cut and 3 mm space).

The Braille tool is loaded with clear acrylic Braille spheres that are inserted into small holes. These holes are milled with a special spindle to create raised dots that are readable with fingertips.
Rollem has launched the PB-10 Digital On-Demand drilling system for working with toner-based print products, such as perfect-bound books, stitched books, manuals, coated sheets or plastics. Hole patterns, from a single hole up to a 23 hole Wire-O pattern, are programmed into the PB-10 DOD for recall and job changeovers.

Operators can make all needed adjustments using a touch screen panel, including hole pattern, paper size, spine margin, read stroke and spindle speed are that automatically set.

“The PB-10 DOD is unrivaled in its compatibility for the digital market with its simple touch controls and ease of operation,” said Allen Hammer, Product Manager for the Durselen line of paper-drilling machines. “It is ideal for short-run drilling with frequent change of hole patterns and/or paper size. There is no other paper drill on the market with this automation and virtually no set up time between jobs.”

Rollem explains two individually driven drill heads move automatically to any position and drill any hole pattern. This flexibility is ideal for applications that change regularly and require minimal size runs. Up to 99 programs can be stored.

Standard features include stroke and spindle speed control, cooling and lubrication and motorized drill belt. Movements are guided by wear-free linear ball bearing guides, ball bearing lead screws and a cam lever for the stroke.

Featured in PrintAction magazine's February 2015 issue, now available online, Vic Stalam describes his new role as President of Highcon Americas and why the company's unique Euclid cutting and creasing technology can disrupt one of printing’s most enduring long-run sectors. The full article is available in the print edition or via PrintAction's digital archive.

 

How is Highcon’s Direct to Pack technology unique?
Vic Stalam: Nothing else exists today in terms of what we have to offer… Highcon is the first to offer a totally digital Direct to Pack solution to the folding-carton market. It also handles both [worlds]. It doesn’t have to be digitally printed, it can also be analogue. Truth be told, most of the volume is still analogue and we need to support that. So, in this sense, it is not only the technology that is unique, but also the fact that we support both digital and analogue.

What stands out most about Highcon’s DART technology?
VS: The paper movement is right to left and, in stage one, once the paper is registered… the polymer is UV-cured and then it produces the creasing lines. It is very unique in that sense. Because it can address any point on the paper, you have opportunities to create very, very unique applications. Once the line is creased – and it is folded through the creasing lines – the next major stage is the laser, which does the actual cutting.

What’s unique about our technology is, not only DART and the way the polymer is laid, but also the way it is creased and then how it is registered for the laser to cut it. Typically when you use a high-powered laser you can burn all kinds of other things like paper or folding carton. Our technology takes care of [this challenge] so that you do not see any of that. It is a very clean process.

How are Euclid’s digital optics important to the laser-writing process?
VS: With the optics you not only have edge registration, which is mechanical, but we also have optical registration. With traditional die cutting, you just do not have the precision of a laser, so everything you see [off the Euclid] is going to be a higher quality product, as it relates to registration and the quality of the cut itself.

What advantage does Highcon, relative to printing’s historic postpress players, have when it comes to developing new approaches for finishing folding-carton work?
VS: I always think of the great Canadian Wayne Gretzky and a famous quote. Somebody in the press asked him, “You are not a big guy, what makes you great?” He said, which always sticks in my mind, “I always try to be one step ahead. I always try to get to where the puck is going to be next and I do not worry about where the puck is now.” I think that is where Highcon is going… positioning ourselves as customers move to digital – how is it going to help them in the future?

How would you compare Highcon’s potential impact to another stage of printing evolution, such as when film was eliminated in prepress?
VS: The world is going to be very different in just a few years – I guarantee you that. This is the disruption and we are going to be a big part of that on the finishing side. Remember how we used to have these film-based companies called trade shops – absolutely, same analogy. Trade finishers have an opportunity to embrace this new technology and grow or else they are going to fall by the wayside.

How can a technology like Euclid ease the ability for commercial printers to get into packaging?
VS: Having spent a lot of my life in both commercial printing and packaging, 70 percent of what commercial printers do is the same as what packaging printers do… There are differences. One is the language they speak. Commercial printers talk about pages and packaging printers obviously do not. There is an issue around substrates. Then there is an issue around specialty colours. Commercial printers now do six, seven colours. With packaging customers it is not unusual to see 10, 12, 14 with all of the varnishes, all of the metallics.


But when it comes to digital technology, the one thing I like about commercial printers is that they are trying hard to get digital right. I think they are probably five to 10 years ahead of packaging printers as far as digitization is concerned. I give them credit for that. Given their experience with digital technology, given their desire to get into packaging, I think solutions like Euclid will help.

How does Highcon benefit from the growth in digital press development for packaging?
VS: We are in constant dialogue with all of these digital press companies, whether it is HP, Xerox, Xeikon, Landa or Kodak, whoever, because the nature of the relationship between us is very symbiotic. We need each other, because if we can get a lot of short-run jobs printed with digital that will make the Euclid system very successful. They need us because they can do all of the digital printing, but it comes to a screeching halt if they have to depend on an analogue process for finishing. We are the missing link to complete that whole digitization process for end customers.

What type of printing company should be looking at Euclid?
VS: We are looking for companies who are very progressive and innovative, who want to look at new technology. That is one vector. The second one is we are looking for companies who either have digital or, more importantly, they are in the process of moving toward digital. We have a few customers who do not have any digital and are just putting it in now, after they put in the Euclid, because it also supports analogue. The third vector we are looking for is customers who want to grow with new applications, who are willing to work with their customers, the brand owners, to help them grow.

What type of industry sectors are being targeted for Euclid as a starting point?
VS: There are about three major sectors. One is clearly commercial printers who are doing folding carton. This is going to be key. Two is packaging printers who are doing a lot of the other stuff like labels. And the third sector is trade finishers, the prepress houses of the finishing business. Those are the three big ones as we move ahead.

There are also some very creative design applications to take advantage and we will build on that as we go forward in time.

How much investment is needed to add Euclid in your facility?
VS: Just as a ballpark, the entry-level product is around $690,000. That is where it starts and then you can add things to it.

What savings can be realized through Euclid, specifically by eliminating traditional die-cutting processes?
VS: It takes about 15 minutes to set up a job in terms of the Euclid. In the case of die cutting, first of all, probably you have to send the job outside. You have to schedule it and then it takes typically anywhere from one to three days. The actual set up time is between four to eight hours on the die-cutting side depending on the complexity of the job versus 15 minutes, so there is a huge difference in the set-up times.


In the case of die cutting, they will have to store [a new die] in the event that they may have to reuse it at some point, which means they need a huge inventory management system and storage space. Think of the old days of film; how you had to store film and then go find it when needed. It is just a mess. Go back to the days of stripping a piece of film on a light table. And it also depends on the experience of the operator.


How many Euclid systems are currently installed in North America?
VS: We have four in North America right now, with one currently going in. We just launched the product in North America at Graph Expo [September 2014].

Do you have projections for how many Euclid systems should be installed on an annual basis?
VS: No, it is too early to tell. One of my jobs is to size the market, how big the opportunity is. As the new guy, I am going to go look at it with a fresh set of eyes. Ask me in three months.

How is Euclid’s consumables opportunity attractive to Highcon?
VS: There are three consumables that go with the system. The first one is the polymer. And this is the polymer I talked about earlier, which creates the creasing line. The polymer is first put on the foil and then it is UV hardened and then it creates a creasing line on the substrate.

The second one is the foil onto which the crease lines are written. And those two are one to one. For every job, you need a polymer and you need a foil. And the last consumable is called the counter substrate, which supports the high-quality creasing. It is replaced approximately every 120 jobs on average, so that is probably once every two months, depending on how many jobs you run.

Is the foil and polymer developed by Highcon or a third-party?
VS: Highcon develops it all. It is optimized to run – absolutely.

What hidden costs should printers consider before investing in Euclid?
VS: There are two things. The power requirement. Make sure they have enough power in the plant. And two is the chilling unit. Make sure there is enough accommodation for the chilling unit.

How does Euclid deal with waste material?
VS: This is a very important point. We are also unique in terms of how we automatically strip off all of the waste materials into a collection bin, which is totally automated. You cannot do that with traditional die cutting. It is a mess when you look at a traditional die-cutting machine – carton board is all over the place.

How will Highcon reach the market in the Americas, particularly here in Canada?
VS: Today, we have an agent out of Winnipeg called Canadian Printing Equipment. I’m going to be coming up in the next few weeks and doing an assessment on what do we need. At the same time, we continue to work with digital press partners. But right now it is definitely a dealer model for Canada, given how big the country is and what we need to do.

What technology challenges does Euclid still face?
VS: We continue to listen and learn from cutomers and we will not be a one-trick pony. We are committed to being an R&D powerhouse in this space and we are building a portfolio of products. One of the reasons why I joined the company is because of its strong commitment to R&D and the desire to listen and continue to iterate on the product. In my experience, with new products, that is the only way to do it.

What struck you most on your recent tour of Highcon’s facility in Israel?
VS: I believe in the technology. I believe in the value of what it will do for our customers and their customers. I have had the opportunity over the years to work with several Israeli companies. Their passion in terms of technology and their hard-work ethic is just incredible. I was there for four days. I was trying to cram in as much as possible. I was there every day from 8 o’clock to 8 o’clock, before we went for dinner, and I saw almost the whole team working. That is passion in terms of new technology.

What excites you most about Highcon’s technology and its potential impact?
VS: The single biggest thing that I am excited about is the fact that for brand owners, especially for folding-carton end customers, it means that now they can push for short runs without a lot of additional cost, at a very affordable rate. Today short run [folding carton] is not affordable because the finishing is very, very expensive. We are going to bring a lot of value to brand owners in terms of helping them grow their brand. I think that is going to have a major impact.


It is also going to cut down on the amount of time they need to bring a new product out. Brand owners take months and months when they have a new product to get on the shelf, so every day counts. Also new applications, which you could never produce with traditional die cutting.

What is your most important message to PrintAction’s readers?
VS: There is a major shift going on within the folding-carton market, to go digital. And we are going to be a major part of it. We are going to make it happen because it brings value to our customers and their customers. There is going to be a seismic shift even if today a lot of the volume is still traditionally printed. It is just a matter of time before the shift happens.

 

Sydney Stone, the exclusive Canadian distributor of Morgana’s line of creasing, folding, numbering and booklet-making equipment, plans to launch the new Morgana BM 350 and BM 500 offline and near-line booklet makers at Graphics Canada, taking place in Mississauga from April 16 to 18.


This will be the first time the Morgana BM 350 and BM 500 booklet makers will be shown at a North American trade show, which is to include demonstrations of the new products.

Sydney Stone explains the Morgana BM 350 and BM 500 booklet makers have been offered for more than a year as inline systems by Xerox and Ricoh, but are now available as both near-line and offline versions. Sydney Stone also states these higher capacity booklet makers (35 and 50 sheet capacity) enable printers to finish work that is increasingly printed on higher quality coated and art papers without over taxing the booklet maker.

The near-line Morgana solution includes a 21-inch high capacity dual bin sheet feeder, while the off line solution is a handfed booklet maker with optional square spine press and face trimming.

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