Printing

Durst is preparing to launch a new large-format-printing platform, called the P5 Series, beginning with what the company describes as its flagship P5 250 HS system, which is scheduled to start shipping this April. 

The P5 250 HS is targeted toward high-volume industrial production, as well as one-offs with what Durst describes as offset quality. P5 relates to five core features at the heart of this technology: Productivity, reliability, workflow, versatility and print quality. The Durst P5 features a two-pass mode with up to 240 sqm/h speed and hresolution modes of up 1,200 dpi – based on a drop-size of 5 pcl. When compared to its existing Durst P10 250 HS, the new generation P5 is designed to be 70 percent more productive. It features MEMS nozzle plates, powered by Durst proprietary data-path and electronics, for a high-speed printing system with precise drop placement and industrial level reliability.
“The new P5 platform, including workflow software and advanced service tools, represents our key strategy to further invest into large format printing technology and further afield,” said Christoph Gamper, Chief Executive of Durst Group. “We believe that there is a lot to explore in this market space and the P5 250 HS is our first statement.” The P5 Series of printers is supported with newly developed software and workflow solutions, as well as touch operation-based user interfaces and remote service capabilities. Durst explains its P5 industrial design reaches a step further with the P5 Series. The company had a design studio from Munich canvas opinions from customers and operators with a view to integrating their wishes into a new concept machine. The results will be incorporated into many Durst product lines in the future.
At C!Print 2018 in Lyon, France, running from February 6 to 8, Agfa Graphics introduced its new Anapurna H1650i LED inkjet printing system. The 1.65-metre-wide hybrid printer, according to the company, is designed as an accessible and cost-effective LED production system. Agfa explains the Anapurna H1650i LED is a smaller version of its Anapurna H2050i LED printer, while sharing some of the same features. Like other systems in the Anapurna series, the H1650i LED prints on rigid and flexible media by means of LED curing, and includes Agfa’s thin-ink-layer and white-ink technologies.“The hybrid Anapurna H1650i LED printer was designed as a robust, qualitative and versatile entry-level option for wide-format print service providers,” said Philip Van der Auwera, Product Manager, Agfa Graphics. “Although smaller, it is equipped with features normally reserved for higher-end printers, such as automatic head height measurement, crash prevention and an anti-static bar, thus offering the very best at a reasonable price.”
Anapurna LED engines also leverage a reinforced belt drive and shuttle beam, a gradient and multi-layer functionality and six 12-picoliter print heads. The printers are fitted with air-cooled UV LED lights that allow for printing on thin and thermal sensitive substrates, with lower energy consumption than traditional UV curing methods.
HP has commercially released what it describes as the world’s most-secure large-format printer for GIS mapping by adding tools like HP Secure Boot and Whitelisting for its next-generation, 44-inch DesignJet T1700. The improved security of the T1700, explains HP, is designed to help enterprises print CAD and GIS applications while protecting printers and data from unauthorized or malicious access in infrastructure construction, urban planning as well as utilities industries like oil, water, gas and electricity. “Security is a top concern in enterprises today as connected devices and increasingly open office spaces are pervasive. At the same time, data breaches are growing at an alarming pace. In the first half of 2017, the worldwide breach level index was up more than 160%,” said Guayente Sanmartin, General Manager and Global Head, HP Large Format Design Printing. “The HP DesignJet T1700 Printer Series includes unique advanced security technologies designed to keep corporate network printers, their documents and data protected.” Features include a new self-encrypting hard drive on the printer that ensures it is only readable by the printer itself, even if removed from the device. For additional device security, HP Secure Boot provides BIOS protection, and Whitelisting only allows approved firmware to be installed and run on the device. The Whitelisting feature will be available in mid-2018.To process larger GIS files, the DesignJet T1700 printer now offers a new processing architecture using a 500 GB hard disk. The large-format printer also has an embedded Adobe PDF Print Engine.The DesignJet T1700 also leverages a new set of six HP Bright Office Inks with tuned colour profiles and a High Density Printhead. The system also features HP Click printing software for ease of use.
HP Inc. in January 2018 introduced its HP Indigo Wallpaper, a substrate-driven technology to leverage the Indigo 20000 press for wallpaper manufacturing. HP explains this system provides gravure quality with the benefits of on-demand printing.  In addition to short-run production, the new HP Indigo 20000 Digital Press Wallpaper solution is capable of producing high-volume printing at 16,307 square feet per hour with a 29-inch width. The Indigo 20000 is programmed for repeat, frameless printing, which explains HP, makes it ideal for repeated pattern wallpaper applications and more. Wallpapers for the press are available to HP customers through suppliers such as Felix Schoeller and Van Merksteijn. HP also recently announced a new range of durable textiles certified for HP Latex printers to produce soft signage and décor applications, including curtains and blinds, cushions, lampshades, and bags, on materials made from 100 percent cotton, cotton linen or polyester. Some of the new textiles can also achieve washability with a heating process after printing. HP Latex water-based inks now also received ECO PASSPORT Certification from Oeko-Tex for textile applications.
HP Inc. introduced HP PageWide XL printers with up to 70 percent faster output, enabling technical production providers to grow AEC volume and expand business in colour applications. Since the HP PageWide XL printer launch in 2015, more than 5,000 units have shipped, printing approximately three billion square feet (300 million m2) of work.To be launched this December in Canada and the U.S., the new HP PageWide XL 5100 and HP PageWide XL 6000 printers and multifunction printers are aimed at mid-volume enterprise print rooms, central reprographic departments and reprographic houses. At speeds up to 24 D/A1-size prints per minute, the series is primarily targeting technical document production for architects and engineers, in addition to geographic information system (GIS) maps and point-of-sale (POS) poster applications.“The debut of new HP PageWide XL printers is another giant leap on the HP journey to offer continued innovation in large-format printing for the designers of the future,” said Guayente Sanmartín, General Manager and Global Head, HP Large Format Design Printing. “The breakthrough PageWide XL platform with even faster printing speeds will also help our customers move the needle for business with immediate monochrome and colour prints delivered from one unique printer.” The HP PageWide XL 5100 prints at speeds up to 20 D/A1 pages per minute with 28-second first page out and the HP PageWide XL 6000 at 24 D/A1 size pages per minute with a 25-second first page out. The printers produce what HP describes as crisp lines, 2-point text, smooth grayscales, and vibrant colour. The new systems also feature functionality for the integrated scanners such as smart background removal. HP is also now offering increased productivity for the HP PageWide XL portfolio with new software. HP SmartStream offers two new modules. Document Organizer lets the user automatically rename large volumes of files using OCR technology, for saving time in job management. Using job pixel coverage, Pixel Analysis provides quotes before printing. HP SmartTracker helps users control printing costs and enable reimbursement.
Epson introduced a new wide-format printer to produce digital dye-sublimation transfers for a range of polyester textile and apparel applications. The 64-inch Epson SureColor F9370 provides speeds up to 1,169 square feet/hour and features an integrated new fabric wiping system coupled with what the company describes as a highly accurate roll-to-roll media support system to handle economical lightweight transfer papers. Designed to support high-speed, economical, medium- to large-volume dye-sublimation transfer printing, the SureColor F9370 replaces the SureColor F9200 to join Epson’s complete line of SureColor F-Series printers, including the SureColor F6200 and SureColor F7200.The SureColor F9370 leverages dual PrecisionCore TFP printheads and Epson’s latest dye-sublimation ink technology – Epson UltraChrome DS with High-Density Black. The new media feed system also provides support for heavier media rolls and transfer paper as thin as 40gsm to support a range of production needs – from fabric production and customized promotional production to soft signage, cut-and-sew sports apparel and home décor applications.
Konica Minolta Business Solutions is introducing its new WEBjet 200D and WEBjet100D continuous feed inkjet presses at inkjet Summit 2018 in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, running until April 11.The company explains the printing systems are the result of a three-way marketing, distribution and servicing partnership between itself, Super Web and Memjet. The presses will be officially launched later in the spring of 2018. Manufactured by Super Web and leveraging Memjet print-head technology, both continuous feed inkjet printers will target high-speed and high-volume applications in the transaction, direct-mail, publishing and in-plant business sectors. The WEBJet line, which comes standard with rollstand and stacker, will complement Konica Minolta’s existing cut-sheet toner and inkjet products.“All in all, it’s a mutually favorable arrangement for everyone. The addition of the WEBjet 200D and 100D fills a gap in our product portfolio we wanted to address,” said Dino Pagliarello, Vice President, Product Management and Planning, Konica Minolta. “And, it gives Super Web, the manufacturer, and by extension, Memjet, the digital technology provider, a suite of marketing and servicing capabilities to address a wider customer base.”The WEBJet line is designed to give medium-size companies an affordable way to step into high-quality, variable data colour inkjet work. With a volume capacity of up to 20 million duplex colour letter size pages per month, WEBJet targets shifting page volumes from offset to digital, or moving colour toner volume to a new platform. Super Web explains that a single operator can manage the WEBJet’s large volume continuous feed.“We are excited to enter into this agreement to extend the reach of our solutions to many more customers through Konica Minolta and its world-class service team – which will support WEBJet in the field,” said Paul Schwartz, President of Super Web.
Ricoh has enhanced its continuous-feed inkjet portfolio with a new set of inks for its Pro VC60000 platform, which also includes the recently introduced Pro VC40000 model. The company explains this ink introduction “greatly expands” the range of media that can be used on these VC-branded inkjet systems.The new Ricoh Pro VC60000 inks, explains the company, are designed to streamline printing directly to traditional offset coated papers, making the entire production system more versatile and economical. Ricoh continues to explain these new inks hold an improved adhesion that allows for faster printing speeds with coated papers. The pigment-based technology is also described as improving durability, water fastness and print-head reliability.Introduced in February 2017, the Ricoh Pro VC40000 operates at speeds of up to 120 metres per minute, allowing it to produce more than 100,000 letter images per hour. It also supports paper from 40 to 250 gsm, which Ricoh explains allows for application possibilities from lightweight books to high-coverage postcards. 

The Pro VC40000 features separate black and colour print-head arrays, which the company explains to allow for cost-effective printing of colour and monochrome applications. An optional fifth print-head array enables the use of additional fluid choices, such as MICR or security inks.
Canon introduced new iQuarius MX inks for the Océ VarioPrint i-series of sheetfed inkjet presses. Scheduled to be available from April 2018, these third-generation inks for the VarioPrint i-series have been specifically developed to meet the needs of working with offset coated papers for high-quality printing.The new Océ iQuarius MX inks, explains Canon, enable the application of higher ink coverage on a range of offset coated stocks, which in turn extends the platform’s range to more demanding applications like higher quality books, manuals and direct mail. Océ iQuarius MX inks are used in combination with the company’s ColorGrip inline paper conditioning technology to optimize ink adhesion and absorption.
“Since the original launch of the Océ VarioPrint i-series in 2015, we have been actively driving the performance of the technology and inks to enable more customers to take advantage of this ground-breaking press concept,” said Peter Wolff, Senior Director, Customer Groups Commercial Printer & CRDs at Canon Europe. “Having initially focused on the transactional and direct-mail segments, with the launch of ColorGrip at drupa 2016 we extended the scope of the press to standard coated offset media and, therefore, to higher quality direct mail and books.”The original iQuarius ink for the Océ VarioPrint i-series will now be branded as Océ iQuarius MP ink (Multi Purpose), to distinguish it from the new iQuarius MX (Media Extended) version, allowing customers to choose the appropriate level of ink performance for their applications. For current Océ VarioPrint i-series customers, MX-upgrades will be made available on request.The Océ VarioPrint i300 press with iQuarius MX inks has achieved Fogra 51 certification.
Xerox is introducing the Trivor 2400 High Fusion Inkjet Press with the company’s new High Fusion Ink to print direct to offset coated paper on the Trivor 2400.The company explains the new High Fusion Ink is designed to remove one of the cost hurdles of commercial printers adopting inkjet technology, which often includes the expense of pre-or-post coating the paper, adding hardware, or having to purchase specialty inkjet coated paper. The Trivor 2400 High Fusion Inkjet Press will be available for installation starting in October worldwide. It will be available for order taking at PRINT 17 in Chicago.High Fusion Ink is specially formulated to optimize printing and drying on offset coated media including matte, silk and glass stock from 60 to 250 gsm, up to 250 feet per minute. While High Fusion Ink is optimized for commodity offset coated papers, it also runs on a range of uncoated media, providing cost-effective redundancy for print work.“The speed, great colour range and ability to print on regular offset coated stock with no pre- or post-treatment makes the Trivor 2400 High Fusion Inkjet Press a breakthrough innovation in production inkjet,” said David Zwang, principal consultant, Zwang & Co.
Domino Digital Printing Solutions is launching a new fluorescent ink for its K600i piezo drop on demand ink jet printer at Labelexpo Europe 2017, running from in late September in Brussels, Belgium.The company explains this latest ink addition, UV80CL, is designed for security printing and brand protection to help firms battle counterfeiting and forgery.Domino’s UV80CL ink prints clear, but fluoresces green, under an ultraviolet UV-A 365nm blacklight. It can be used to print 2D codes, barcodes, alpha numeric codes, images, graphics and personalised data printing, all of which may be used in security, authentication and anti-counterfeit applications. Domino explains the combination of printing variable data with green fluorescence provides a high complexity rating which would be extremely difficult to replicate.This makes it well suited to use to add security marks and features to currency, stamps, tax stamps, passports and certificates to prevent forgery, tampering or counterfeiting of such items. It can also be used to incorporate security features onto labels and packaging for traceability to safeguard against counterfeiting and parallel trade.The Domino K600i printer can be integrated into an existing web-fed press, or used as a standalone roll-to-roll solution or finishing line, and the UV80CL ink is compatible with standard medias including polyethylene, polypropylene and coated and uncoated papers.“In today’s price competitive and technology savvy marketplace, it is imperative that brand owners establish a strong and effective anti-counterfeiting and brand protection programme to safeguard their brands,” said Mark Herrtage, Aftercare Product Manager at Domino Printing Solutions. “With that in mind, the Domino UV80CL fluorescent ink provides security, label and packaging converters with an added value offering to assist brand owners on this quest.”
Four of Canada’s technology leaders discuss the current state of production inkjet technology and what impact it is having in the domestic printing market.After  decades of intense research and development, supported by unprecedented technology partnerships, production-strength inkjet on the cusp of disrupting commercial printing. In mid-June, four of Canada’s technology leaders travelled to Burnaby, BC, to participate in a panel discussion focused on the business strategy of production inkjet at PrintAction’s one-day PrintForum West conference. The panelists included: Alec Couckuyt, Senior Director, Canon Canada, Professional Printing Solutions Group; Brad King, VP, Graphics Communications, Xerox Canada; Ray Fagan, Sheetfed Product Manager, Heidelberg Canada; and Edward Robeznieks, VP of Sales, Ricoh Canada. Below are key excerpts from their hour-long discussion.Why should printers invest in inkjet today, are we past the bleeding-edge?Alec Couckuyt: Yes – we are past the bleeding edge. There has been tremendous evolution in the technology with inkjet… The commercial printer right now is really looking at how can I better serve my customer and inkjet technology together with offset, wide format and digital are all services that are being offered. It really has gone from just putting ink on paper to how can I better serve my customer in a total cycle.Brad King: Cutsheet inkjet is new from a strategic point of view. In Canada, we have one [Xerox Brenva] install that we can talk about and two others we cannot talk about, so it is still fairly new. There is a lot of interest from commercial printers about these products – how it fits, what are the applications, where does it play. More products and applications are coming and the inkjet space is very close to exploding.Ray Fagan: If you think about cutting-edge or bleeding-edge technology it is still, in my opinion, in its infancy in terms of long-term development. We took the advantage of some existing platforms of the XL 106 sheet transport, feeder, delivery that have been around a long time.. and we partnered with Fuji for the inkjet heads using Samba technology and their expertise to combine both technologies into one machine. We got to market fairly quickly and launched it at drupa.There are still a lot of learning curves, a lot of consistency challenges… But our first [Primefire 106] press has been installed in Europe with a beta site at a packaging customer and we will do another machine this year. The roll out will continue to be slow... By 2018 we will finish our beta testing and move into serial production.Ed Robeznieks: Because we migrated to our [Ricoh] 60000 platform we are able to now go to commercial printers and say you can move offset work over. We can run coated stocks, thicker stocks… we are not running 300, 350 gsm, but we are running 250, 260 and that has opened up the door.Copywell in Toronto put in a VC60000… They took an original application which was sold as an [offset] sheet run and have now billed 2.5 to 3 million feet a month, which are true offset transfer applications.How does inkjet present new opportunities for printers?Couckuyt: An example of a new application for one our clients is magazines… They are actually personalizing or regionalizing the advertising in the magazine. Part of the magazine is printed offset and then the variable part is printed on the inkjet web and then they assemble it. That is an advantage they can sell to their client – the ability of having regionalized information for a specific advertiser. So it is a new way of approaching the market and creating new opportunities. The critical part is that we can now combine variability with static… The question of whether inkjet can replace offset is the wrong question. Offset and inkjet together open more opportunities for clients.King: When inkjet came out it was roll-to-roll, big machines, two million plus investment in capital. You needed big volumes to justify the roll-to-roll devices and there were not a lot of printers who could participate in the economics of inkjet. Now the technology is coming down for lower volumes, as an investment with cutsheet devices, so that mid-sized commercial printers can start playing in this game...  You can do a short-run campaign with similar economics that the big players are using today. That is where inkjet is really going to open up big opportunities.These devices are not $100,000 yet – still a pretty good number that you have to spend – but they are not $2.5 million roll-to-roll devices that need to be running 3, 4, 10 million impressions a month to have the economics make sense.Fagan: Because [Heidelberg’s] Primefire is basically focusing on the packaging market, as we roll out the product, there are a lot of things happening in packaging that are forcing those printers to look at economics a little bit differently. As run lengths decrease in packaging, it is harder to make money because you do not have the pure volumes. The customer demand for individualization is growing and it is really in its infancy.We have seen jobs where a 100,000 sheet run is broken into batches of 500 cartons... and this is where the digitization of the industry and the industries around us in advertising are driving manufacturers to do something quite a bit different. Major brands are really forcing that upon packaging printers.We also see a lot of legislation for packaging with batching and traceability of the package through UPC codes. It could be in the European market in the near future where every single box has an individual identification marker on it so that we can trace it back to its origins. And this is due to the amount of piracy.Robeznieks: As the price goes down for devices inkjet will become more attractive. It is good for us in a way as manufacturers. Because there is so much downward pressure on operating costs right now, it is becoming difficult for us to make a profit because of servicing the equipment and toner-based technology requires a lot more service than inkjet-based technology. So it is better for us in the long run, from our perspective, to move toward inkjet. Your gain [as a printer] is operating costs and flexibility where you can do variable, but you are going to be able to take advantage of significant cost savings with inkjet versus toner. How do you describe total cost of ownership for inkjet to printers?Couckuyt: Inkjet uptime is a really critical issue. If you are used to a digital press, uptime is in the 60, 70 percent range. If you look at [Canon’s] i300, for example, it has a minimum uptime of 95 percent. When we start talking about total cost of ownership, for a commercial printer and a specific job, that could mean dedicating three shifts [on a toner device] or doing it with inkjet in two shifts… when you look at the evolution of inkjet devices a lot of R&D effort went into building those machines so that they really look after themselves. King: Inkjet is new technology, that over the next 15 to 20 years, I feel is going to change the printing industry. It allows variable print onto all substrates... It is going to allow us to offer our customers, and printers’ customers, some pretty impressive product solutions to help keep print alive... having strong economics to keep print relevant for people who use marketing communications. This is really where inkjet TCO will help keep print alive, because it is variable and it will have something valuable to sell to the people who want to use print as a marketing vehicle versus just going digital. Fagan: We do not see inkjet supplanting offset in a large way for quite some time. We think they are going to run in harmony based on what is being produced. And if you follow that philosophy, the total cost of ownership for the offset printing press can also be improved... because you have another alternative which improves the total cost of ownership on your other equipment.    You are also reducing costs in prepress and you are reducing costs in other areas of building. You do not have to warehouse products. There are a lot of other costs that inkjet lends itself to... that lends itself to a facility’s overall production cost.Robeznieks: There are still heavy users of offset technology that are going to be difficult for us to strip away... it really comes down to a manufacturer partner who understands a certain vertical really well and who can help you understand your client base and then figure out where the footprint fits.Why will variable be more impactful for inkjet than it was for toner?Robeznieks: I’m going to give the non-politically correct answer but it is not. If you have a good working relationship with your client and can help them with variable campaigns, it doesn’t matter what you use – inkjet, toner, there are lots of ways to interact with the client. What is very interesting is the next phase of inkjet which will be direct to shape... That is a whole different ball game, because now you are going to have things done on the manufacturing line. All of a sudden our devices are no longer creating labels, they are going directly to their object. And all of us are looking at how to get into that space.Fagan: Big Data has been slow in being understood by a lot of people... in terms of managing the data and properly executing it into a portfolio of products. I really think Big Data in general, Industry 4.0, all of that growth we are seeing right now is accelerating at a very high pace and it is going to become much more manageable to do large variable data programs, computing that information, managing it and getting it where it needs to go. I see growth in that area with inkjet.King: There is a [Xerox] customer in Toronto who has figured a bit of this out. When you go onto a Webpage and click on a couple of items you thought of buying – and then forget about it or leave to go somewhere else – they are actually grabbing that data. That night, they run a batch file with those three items you looked at, print it the next day on a direct-mail piece and it gets mailed out to that customer within 24 hours. That is where I see some of this very interesting data management… You can do a great direct-mail campaign on a very cost effective platform like inkjet.Couckuyt: As a printer, you have to be involved in a lot more than just putting ink on paper... you have to be able to handle data, make sure it is being utilized and sent out to the client in record time to have relevance. This is where we as an industry have to be able to take in that data, configure the data properly, and get it out as fast as possible.We are under pressure to really understand what it is that our clients are communicating, what they need. Inkjet technology and the combination of different technologies, where you go inline or near-line, whichever way you set it up, is an answer to producing relevant communications tools for your client.
Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG is now offering an enhanced rotary die-cutter based on the XL technology, primarily targeting the in-mould label market. Based on a recent Awa Global Inmould Study 2017, the in-mould market is growing globally at around 4.3 percent and more than two thirds of the worldwide production is required for food packaging.The new Speedmaster XL 106-DD, explains the company, unites two key production steps in a single machine, describing this as a unique combination in the market. The rotary die-cutter’s first unit places the injection hole in the label for the subsequent production process by means of a die on a magnetic cylinder with a high level of precision. Heidelberg explains even the tiniest holes of five millimeters diameter or more are possible. This has traditionally been a separate production step.The cut out material is removed by means of an extraction system. The second unit of the XL 106-DD subsequently cuts out the contour of the label from the sheet. Heidelberg explains this combination of the two production steps in a single pass means a doubling of the die-cutting throughput, while makeready times and costs for die cutting tools can be reduced to half of what was previously required.The XL 106-DD processes foils and paper with thicknesses of 0.05 to 0.3 mm at a throughput of 6,000 to 10,000 sheets per hour – almost twice as fast, according to Heidelberg, than a flatbed die-cutter. The machine is typically set up in 15 minutes.Injection holes of five millimeters diameter and more can be cut. Apart from in-mould labels, the XL 106-DD can also cut plastic or paper packaging elements, such as POS items which, due to their design, need a window or hole for mounting in the shelf or for attaching to the product.
Komcan is now distributing DigiNip Sensor technology for fast and accurate nip readings of roller alignment. DigiNip is a handheld electronic nip sensor system that provides diagnosis of roller conditions at the nip contact point. Komcan explains the system requires minimal investment and no prior experience to accurately record spot nip width at any section of the web or sheetfed process. The product allows for nip readings to be determined instantly and adjustments made while the DigiNip sensors are between your rolls. The sensor elements that connect into the DigiNip device are designed to provide thousands of readings before replacement is necessary. The technology is designed to act rapidly on the cause of problems, not on the effects. It is estimated that DigiNip allows users to reduce nip measurement time by at least 50 percent, while also significantly reducing paper waste and providing ink savings based on better water/ink emulsion.
Heidelberg has launched the 37-inch-format Speedmaster CS 92 into the North American market. The company reports numerous machines have been installed worldwide, primarily with small commercial printers needing to print 30 million impressions and upwards per year on one machine. The Speedmaster CS 92 was first launched at China Print 2015 as a press for printers looking to consolidate multiple, older machines or wanting to upgrade from a half-size press to widen their market offering. The new press is available in standard four- and five-colour configurations with and without coater or as a six-colour plus coater model. The CS 92 is also available with UV curing. Heidelberg states based on its productivity versus price performance, the new press offers the lowest cost per sheet against any other competitive press in its class. With a format size of 25 x 37 inches (8-up letter size sheets), Heidelberg explains customers benefit from a 20 percent plate savings over traditional 40-inch presses.Built upon the platform of the Speedmaster CD 102, the CS 92 prints up to 15,000 sheets per hour and comes standard with Preset Plus Feeder and Delivery. It can also be equipped with Intellistart technology to shorten makeready times.
Komori has commercially released its new Lithrone G37 press in the North American market. Komcan of Georgetown, Ontario, is the Canadian dealer for Komori presses.Described by Komori as a compact press that can produce A1-size products, the Lithrone G37 provides a 640 x 940 mm maximum sheet size (printing sheets up to 37-inches wide) and is equipped with an updated version of the KHS-AI integrated control system for quick press start-up. Komori explains colour management can be implemented by including a CMS colour bar on sheets even with 8-up A4 or American letter-size impositions. Its format size is also well suited, explains the company, for printing items in the international standard A1 poster size, while providing flexibility in layout criteria such as bindery register marks. The Lithrone G37 produces a maximum printing speed of up to 15,000 sheets per hour. It also provides what Komori describes as stable high-speed operation over the 0.04 to 0.6 mm sheet thickness range. The press can be integrated with Komori’s H-UV drying system.
Komori Corporation has added a new press to its Lithrone G Series, the Lithrone GX44RP offset press, describing the system as the ultimate in one-pass double-sided printing. The 44-inch Lithrone GX44RP is equipped with H-UV technology to deliver high quality, high productivity and short turnaround stability for double-sided printing.Komori describes the press as being well suited for applications like publication printing, magazines and books, and duplex package printing. Key features of the new press include single-edge gripping, which makes the margin on the tail edge of the sheets unnecessary. This enables paper costs to be cut by minimizing the sheet size. The Lithrone GX44RP also employs four double-size transfer cylinders, which eliminates sheet reversal and to help provide stable sheet transport for handling either light or heavy stocks through. Additionally, front/back plate imaging is in the same direction, (just as with single-sided presses) increasing efficiency in prepress. Supported by the KHS-AI integrated control system, benderless Full-APC and the H-UV curing system, the Lithrone GX44RP provides short makeready and powderless instant drying to accommodate fast turnarounds. Options that can be included with the press are the A-APC Asynchronous Automatic Plate Changer, the PDC-SX Spectral Print Density Control SX ,odel and the PQA-S Print Quality Assessment System.
Flint Group is introducing a new UV lamp retrofit conversion program called VANTAGE LED aimed at sheetfed printers. The full suite of products and services included in the retrofit program consists of pre-conversion consulting and training, LED inks and coatings, matching pressroom chemicals and blankets, as well as service support during and after conversion.At the heart of the VANTAGE LED program, according to Flint, are EcoLUX LED lamps supplied by Air Motion Systems, which develops LED UV technology often applied in the sheetfed offset industry. Flint explains VANTAGE LED is geared toward users of legacy UV methods and for those printers who have had no exposure to UV curing methods but are now investigating LED technologies. “LED curing technology will change sheetfed offset printing forever – there is no doubt,” said Jim Buchanan, Global UV Business Development Director for Flint Group Packaging & Narrow Web. “VANTAGE LED has been developed to ensure those wishing to convert to LED curing can do so with confidence in a very short space of time. Our expert print technicians will audit an operation in the first instance and a full cost-benefit analysis will follow – a press can be converted in as little as one day. “We have seen a staggering increase in factory-fitted LED presses, but the process of converting existing presses to LED, with retro-fitted lamp systems, allows printers a fast track to the benefits this technology brings.”
Xante has introduced the new En/Press as its next-generation digital envelope press. En/Press is a four-color process press built around an Adobe PostScript controller that delivers full-colour output at up to 60 letter-size pages per minute or 4,000 #10 envelopes per hour with variable data. Powered by Xante’s iQueue workflow software, En/Press produces print quality of up to 4,800 dpi.The En/Press includes PlateMaker 8 computer-to-plate technology, meaning the same press that produces envelopes, NCR forms, and stationery, can also produce polyester plates. PlateMaker 8 takes advantage of the En/Press technology to produce Myriad2 plates on a variety of sizes up to 13 x 19.38 inches that are suited for one- or two-colour jobs.At 13-inches wide, the En/Press media input handles a range of popular envelope and sheet sizes. Its patented Enterprise feed system delivers envelopes up to 13 x 10 inches and sheets up to 13 x 49.6 inches. The Enterprise Feed System has been redesigned with a slimmer profile. While handling the same 1,000 envelope capacity, Enterprise now accepts media as small as 3.5 x 3.5 inches to expand its envelope printing capability. 

“En/Press raises the bar for digital press technology,” said Robert Ross, President and CEO of Xante. “It’s truly a unique solution with its incredible print quality, dead-on spot colour matching, simple ease of use, durability, low cost, and CTP polyester plate printing that Xante customers have come to expect.”
Liquid and dry toner presses continue to advance in fifth station units, print enhancements, media formats and raw printing power, among others toold, as featured in some of these newer engines. OKI 900 Series OKI 900 Series OKI C711WT OKI C711WT HP Indigo Pack Ready HP Indigo Pack Ready HP Indigo GEM HP Indigo GEM Heidelberg Versafire CV Heidelberg Versafire CV Kodak NexPress Substrate Expansion Kodak NexPress Substrate Expansion Kodak NexPress Opaque White Dry Ink Kodak NexPress Opaque White Dry Ink Ricoh Pro C7100 Ricoh Pro C7100 Ricoh Pro 8220 Ricoh Pro 8220 Xeikon CX500 Label Press Xeikon CX500 Label Press Canon varioPRINT DP Canon varioPRINT DP Canon imagePRESS C10000VP Canon imagePRESS C10000VP Canon Océ VarioPrint 6000 TITAN Canon Océ VarioPrint 6000 TITAN Xerox White Dry Ink Xerox White Dry Ink   View the embedded image gallery online at: https://www.printaction.com/index.php?option=com_k2&Itemid=11&lang=en&layout=latest&view=latest#sigProGalleria25270774e3
Digital label printing is one of the most attractive segments for printing growth led by significant new demands from brand owners for short-run versioning and variable print workThe digitization of label production began years ago with bleeding-edge projects but only now is beginning take a foothold across the printing world, which is still dominated by flexography. Some of the globe’s largest brands are reinvesting in print with the shifts in advertising effectiveness to younger generations, who may never watch a television ad or block them entirely online.A recent report by Future Market Insights estimates the demand for digital printing in packaging will grow at 15.3 percent to surpass US$52 billion in revenues by 2026. By product type, labels is currently the largest segment, accounting for over US$7.1 billion in revenues in 2016. Future Market Insights estimates demand for digital labels will increase at 16.7 percent CAGR to reach US$38.4 billion in revenues. The labels segment is estimated to hold the highest market share by the end of the projected period, accounting for more than 70 percent of the global market share by the end of 2027, up from 64.1 percent in 2016.Consider for example, the money invested by Coca-Cola to produce its largest-ever personalized brand campaign, Share a Coca-Cola, launched in 2013 across 32 countries. Coke used printing operations with HP Indigo presses to digitally print labels with 150 of the most popular first names, nicknames and terms of affection – initially 800 million high-quality personalized labels.The Share a Coca-Cola campaign became famous across the printing world because it signified a paradigm shift in what is effective marketing, leveraging print. It is an example of long-run versioning through digital, but the possibilities of digital labels burst open. Commercial printers are certainly attracted to the potential of digital labels but without a large client base will find it hard to invest millions in capital equipment and workflow infrastructure. Instead, many will take the route of entry-level inkjet- or toner-based printing engines, which can be integrated with a range of finishing technologies to work with existing clients and build up a base before committing significant resources. PrintAction spoke with Brett Kisiloski, PDS Sales Manager, about the potential of digital label printing, as well as the challenges and opportunities of investing in entry-level digital printing systems.What kind of systems do printers need to enter digital labels?Kisiloski: cEssentially you need two machines for a full production label system. You have your roll-to-roll label printer and your label finisher, which will laminate, die cut custom shapes, waste matrix, and then you can slit into singles from a multiple-up format. We focus on toner-based printers rather than inkjet – roll-to-roll toner. For us specifically, we use the OKI engines. We carry a few different die cutters but essentially they do the same sort of thing.When is a die-cutter not needed? Kisiloski: The only time we ever suggest to a customer that it is okay for them just to purchase a label printer is if they are only doing one or two sizes of labels… then it is easy for them to print pre-die-cut and they only need to stock one or two sizes in their shop. If you have a lot of other custom sizes, you can’t just phone up your label material provider saying you need new shapes… it is going to cost you twice as much. The flexibility isn’t there. Are more commercial printers looking into digital labels?Kisiloski: A lot of printers like the idea of it. The problem is that even for an entry-level system it is fairly costly if you want to get into a new machine. You are looking at probably an entry cost of definitely no less than $50,000, between $50,000 and $60,000. So you have to think that these printers already have a built-up label business of some sort. I have seen the most random, small print shops that are looking for a label printer. They might be doing hundreds of thousands a month and they have been outsourcing it, because they just happened to stumble across these customers who want labels.Another challenge with digital labels is finding that sweet spot… Is it going to be six cents a label, eight cents a label, because there is a difference when you have a trade printer quoting five cents a label. What really comes into play is that there is a lot of short-run or variable-data label printing.How much work do you need for ROI on an entry-level system?Kisiloski: You actually do not need that many jobs per month for this to make sense. It is likely you are selling that thousand let’s say for $300 and it is costing you maybe $80 to $100 to print. That’s printing, labour and everything, so let’s say $100, and you are making really good margin. If you are making $200 on every order and you get two orders a week you can pay off the machine. So that is really not a ton of volume for someone to jump into it based on getting one or two orders per week. What are the pros and cons of inkjet versus toner?Kisiloski: We carry smaller systems so I do not want to compare too much to the bigger guys… Systems for under $100,000 let’s say. We still sell Memjet print-head [inkjet] systems for envelopes and labels. It is great in the sense that it is really fast and it is quite inexpensive to print in terms of the ink costs. You are printing 60 feet a minute which is two to three times as fast as you are going to get on a toner printer, so it was really interesting a few years ago.The downfall is that you have to print on inkjet-coated material. About three or four years ago it was still cheaper when all was said and done to print on inkjet with the coated material. In the last two to three years, however, coated material prices have gone up big time, so it is very difficult. I would say it is 25 percent cheaper to print any size label using a toner printer rather than an inkjet just because of the material cost.Inkjet is also very finicky. It might have 70,000 print nozzles in a tiny little bar stretching 8 1/2 inches wide, so those things clog easily, whereas toner is very consistent. When does entry-level inkjet make sense today?Kisiloski: I have a customer who prints post-it notes, for example, and because it is a paper you do not need inkjet coating… The paper stock will absorb the ink… an inkjet system is perfect for him, because it is super cheap. He is just paying for the ink and it is really fast. But most people print on gloss paper or polyesters or vinyl, which has to be inkjet coated and you are doubling or tripling your cost. What is most exciting about digital label printing?Kisiloski: The label business is huge. Packaging is a massive industry so it is very exciting to be able to offer that… it is nice to be able to provide different options for a customer when they walk in the door and open up their mind a little bit to other ways of making money
Kernow North America has launched its new KernowPrint for HP Indigo line of printable synthetic materials featuring Cobalt Coating Technology. Describing the new product as ready-to-print and certified synthetic media, KernowPrint includes bright-white synthetics, specialty colors and an expanded range of printable films. The RIT-Certified KernowPrint for Indigo range will include KernowPrint Elite bright white synthetic paper, KernowPrint Vivid and Pastel-coloured synthetic media. The company plans to increase the number of available materials to include vinyl, styrene and specialty media such as metalized films.KernowPrint for Indigo ready-to-run films features proprietary Cobalt Coating Technology, which the company describes as chemistry based of years of research in creating formulations for the digital printing market. Kernow explains Cobalt provides an exceptional print surface and maximizes ink adhesion of the HP Indigo inks, while also providing a high level of static control in films and enhanced stability in difficult prints.“There’s been a strong push from our customers and partners for some time to deliver a range of synthetics for HP Indigo that addresses market needs,” said Kernow’s Dan Lawellin. “In putting together this portfolio of products, we’ve consulted industry leaders and relied heavily on customer feedback to create a product set that not only fills market gaps but takes into consideration the features and benefits that mean the most to printers.  We’ve tried to address as many of these features as possible, – from stabilizing films for easy multi-shot printing to utilizing our Cobalt Technology to control static and improve overall print performance on challenging materials.”
Scodix introduced the new Scodix Ultra2 Pro Digital Enhancement Press with Foil Station, describing the system as “the ultimate multi material platform.” The existing Scodix Ultra Pro system was capable of producing nine different applications and the Scodix Ultra2 is designed to provide more flexibility, quality and productivity. Users of the Scodix Ultra Pro will be able to upgrade to the Scodix Ultra2 starting in 2018.Scodix first introduced the Scodix S system in 2012, followed by the Scodix Ultra. Today, close to 300 Scodix systems are installed worldwide.Scodix explains the Ultra2’s entire print engine has been changed to provide high accuracy of print and cost effectiveness, supported by fast switching between polymers, with improved print quality and material flow. The Scodix Ultra2 includes five ink tanks. A new adaptive LED process controls the curing process with improved accuracy, while the Scodix PAS (Pin Activate Secure) technologies deliver enhancement with ultra-fine detail.“Our aim at Scodix is to continually support our customers to enhance their competitive edge,” said Scodix CEO, Roy Porat. “There is no polymer in the world that is suitable for all substrates. No drop behaves the same on all substrates or all printed material. Consequently, we have developed the Scodix Ultra2 Pro, alongside our variety of innovative polymers designed for different purposes, as a system which can deliver the ultimate results. This is essentially a multi-material platform.”Scodix then announced that its E106 press is now commercially available (beginning December 2017), with the next units set to be installed in the EU and U.S. during Q1 2018. The Scodix E106 made its debut at drupa 2016 and was developed specifically to deliver enhancement solutions for folding-carton converters who need the 1,060 x 760-mm format. It delivers multiple applications, including Scodix Foil, Scodix Sense, Scodix Spot, Scodix Variable Data and Scodix Cast & Cure. It allows users to create products using foil over foil, adding Scodix Sense effects over foil, or personalizing with Scodix Variable Data Sense or Scodix Variable Data Foil.“We are delighted to be progressing into the commercial phase, still working to the schedule we outlined in 2016,” said Porat. “Printers and converters investing in the Scodix E106 will be able to clinch a competitive edge with value-added services that can truly energize brands. The B1 format brings all the advantages of digital enhancement currently being exploited in the commercial market and takes us a step closer a new standard in packaging enhancement.”
Xeikon of Eede, the Netherlands, today announced the termination of its Trillium liquid toner development project. First demonstrated at drupa 2016 via the Trillium One press, the company explains the technology program has encountered several challenges in bringing it to market as a commercial product.“We continuously review our portfolio and we are confident the segments we operate can be well served with our current dry toner technology and the newly launched Panther UV inkjet technology,” said Benoit Chatelard, President and CEO, Digital Solutions, Flint Group, which owns the Xeikon division. “With our dry toner technology, we will continue our focus on both the packaging and document businesses, as well as specialty segments where we bring significant value including security printing and wall décor.”Chatelard continued to describe the company’s rationale behind cancelling its Trillium liquid toner development: “Changing market dynamics but mainly ongoing technical issues in developing the liquid toner technology, including press uptime issues, encouraged us to take this difficult decision, and to communicate it to the marketplace in the straightforward, no-nonsense approach we have always taken,” he added. “Our core vision remains supporting high volume, high quality, high value business for our customers in the graphic arts market and security printing.”In 2015, Xeikon joined Flint Group to create a new Digital Printing Solutions division. Headquartered in Luxembourg, Flint Group employs around 7,900 people.
Goss has launched a colour control upgrade for the 16-page M-600 press, which the company describes as a way to help eliminate potential obsolescence issues for the press model.The benefits of the new automated Omnicolor II press controls, according to Goss, include start-up waste lowered by anywhere from 20 up to 50 percent, as well as significant reductions in turnaround time.“Customers can see the potential pay-off, whatever their current production model may be,” said Rutger Jansen, head of customer service, Goss International Europe. “Together, we plot in their average number of jobs and current makeready figures against the investment cost and the new figures they can reliably expect. I can't claim that the calculation methodology is groundbreaking, but it certainly helps convince our customers that the Omnicolor II upgrade is.”Features of the Omnicolor II upgrade include the ability to automate press setting direct from CIP3 data to reduce what Goss describes as a three-stage process down to a single step, which also helps eliminate error potential.More waste reduction improvements include what the company explains as quicker reaction of the ink keys and repetitive positioning; an ability to move all ink keys simultaneously; and the selection of up to 10 papers and inks, to optimize the presetting.New functionality like Ink Tracking and Color Boost are designed to enable the fastest possible process to achieve good copies. New auto learning, by saving all running job settings, job after job, allows Omnicolor II to fine tune the presetting by taking into account ink, paper and coverage specifications for optimum results.Following a one-day press audit, Goss engineers require full press access for between two and four days to install the upgrade on existing M-600 systems.
Goss International plans to open a new Packaging Technology Center in January 2014 at the company’s headquarters in Durham, New Hampshire. The company’s 650-square-metre (7,000-square-foot) Packaging Center is to be equipped initially with a Goss Sunday Vpak 500 press systemThe facility is being designed to accommodate both brand owners and packaging producers to test, demonstrate and implement cooperative printing programs based on web offset technology. To this end, the centre will also be focused on consumables testing.“The Sunday Vpak platform can provide higher quality, lower costs and faster turn-around times for packaging printing,” stated Rick Nichols, President and CEO of Goss International says. “Our investment in the equipment and the resources to staff this centre demonstrates our commitment to the packaging sector and our confidence in the advantages that web offset can deliver over traditional gravure and flexographic systems.” The Sunday Vpak 500 press system at the Goss Packaging Technology Center will feature seven web offset printing units with a web width of 850 mm (33.5 inches) and a repeat range of 406 to 812 mm (16 to 32 inches). The system will be equipped with a flexo unit and UV and EB curing capabilities and will accommodate film substrates from nine to 75 microns thick and paper products as heavy as 100 gsm. “With the first Sunday Vpak system now producing excellent results and another confidential project underway, we look forward to expanding our ability to demonstrate this new-generation web offset option to packaging producers throughout the world through customized print tests,” explains Peter Walczak, director of product management for Goss packaging presses. Walczak says Goss will host seminars and programs at the Packaging Technology Center that will allow packaging producers, brand owners and suppliers worldwide to jointly explore emerging demands in the market and share new ideas for addressing them. 

“This will also be an industry resource where suppliers can test inks, chemicals and auxiliary technologies for web offset production in a neutral, controlled environment,” stated Peter Walczak, Director of Product Management for Goss packaging presses.Partners supplying equipment and consumables to support the new Packaging Technology Center and its first Sunday Vpak press include ESI, Flint, Martin Automatic, Nela, Prime UV, QuadTech, Technotrans and Vataphone. Additional suppliers will be confirmed prior to the opening of the centre.

Greg Blue becomes the new CEO of manroland web systems Inc. in North America, replacing the leadership of Roland Ortbach, who continues with the organization as Vice President of Sales.“I was very pleased to have had the opportunity to lead our team through our first year,” stated Ortbach. The North American branch of manroland web systems was incorporated in March 2012, when it began business in both the United States and Canada. “We are now ready to move forward and our next critical phase of growth requires the leadership of an individual who has spent much of his career in the service and customer support area of our industry.”Blue brings with him 19 years of experience in the printing industry, including a range of knowledge gained from working in areas like application engineering, project and support management, and aftermarket business development.“I’m excited to take full advantage of the opportunities manroland web systems has in its future,” stated Blue. “My primary goal is to search for new growth opportunities which will continue to strengthen existing relationships with our customers.”In relation to its goals achieved over the past year, manroland web systems points to the strengthening of its parts and service support, relocating its North American parts inventory to a new warehouse in Elk Grove Village, Illinois, expansion of the printcom pressroom consumables product portfolio for U.S. and Canadian customers, relocating North American Headquarters to a new office in Lisle, Illinois, and completing the year with a financial profit.
At China Print 2013, running from May 14 to 18 in Beijing, Goss International is featuring its new Magnum Compact press model. A four-high Magnum Compact tower will be displayed at the show, which is to be demonstrated with Goss’ Autoplate fully automatic plate changing system.The company describes the Magnum Compact press as a cost-effective approach to traditional single-width newspaper and semi-commercial production that is designed to drive new short-run, multi-product business models. It is build for extremely fast changeovers, versatility and simplified operation.Along with the new Magnum Compact model, Goss is highlighting its portfolio of single- and double-width newspaper presses at China Print, including the Community SSC/Magnum series, which the company describes as the market leader for single-width production in Asia, as well as Universal and Uniliner presses and the Colorliner CPS and FPS compact double-width press options.At China Print 2013, Goss is highlighting its Vpak packaging technology as a variable repeat web offset press for folding carton, flexible packaging, pre-print and label printing. Sunday Vpak presses feature quick-change blankets and printing cylinder sleeves and are available in web widths from 520 to 1905 mm. For the commercial printing market, Goss is also highlighting press range from the 16-page M-500 and M-600 models to wider-web Sunday presses, as well as the M-800 model that was recently installed in Beijing with a 4x4 configuration.
It was two decades ago when the first Sunday web press unit entered production. Since then, over 2,300 Sunday printing units have been shipped to 27 countries around the world.The 1993 Harris Sunday press featured the then-revolutionary gapless-blanket technology, which allowed printers to run at 100,000 impressions per hour compared to 75,000 impressions which was typical at the time. The gapless blanket technology reduced vibration and eliminated streaking which led to higher print quality with reduced non-print area, leading to paper savings.Since 1993, the technology changed hands twice, first to Heidelberg Web Systems in 1988 (when Heidelberg bought Harris Graphic) and finally onto Goss International in 2004. Along the way other features have been added, including Autoplate, Automatic Transfer, pinless folding and DigiRail digital inking technologies, as well as automated controls and high-performance splicers, dryers and auxiliaries.The Sunday 3000 won the PIA/GATF InterTech award in 1994 and made its drupa debut in 1995. By the end of that year, 31 units had been installed in six countries. According to Goss, the first Sunday press still remains in operation in the United States.
Goss International has been named as one of five companies to earn a 2012 Siemens Customer Excellence Award. The award recognizes the application of Siemens technology in delivering advanced automation in Goss presses.“We are especially delighted to have been recognized for our achievements in automation, as they are part of our long-term mission to help our customers improve productivity and short-run agility while reducing waste and maintenance requirements,” said Jeff Upchurch, senior vice president of Research and Development at Goss International. “We are streamlining press and finishing system performance, including job changeover processes, with a comprehensive approach aimed at automating, simplifying or even eliminating steps. Results can create new market opportunities for web printers allowing them to compete at run lengths that were formerly in the domain of sheetfed printers.” Other companies receiving awards include Conoco Phillips (oil and gas energy), Fori Automation (equipment designer and manufacturer), Lockheed Martin (aerospace), and GT Advanced Technologies (LED and solar technologies)."Our Customer Excellence Awards illustrate the power of partnership, specifically highlighting best practice sharing and providing inspiration to other users in the Siemens automation user community. Each of this year's winners has clearly demonstrated their leadership in driving innovation, collaboratively overcoming barriers and delivering success," says Raj Batra, President of Siemens Industry Automation Division.
In late February, manroland web systems introduced its new VARIOMAN printing press for flexible packaging. The company explains this technology platform combines the benefits of varied technologies and processes while specifically avoiding the weak points inherent in other technologies. The pilot press, called the VARIOMAN f:line, is an offset gravure hybrid press, which prints foils and provides the proven core competences of the Augsburg press maker like mature design, system integration and service and maintenance packages. The company explains this new packaging press, based on its mixture of offset and gravure, provides particularly short makeready and changeover times with reduced start-up waste rates.manroland web systems’ VARIOMAN f:line is ideally suited for printing flexible foils for shrink-sleeve applications, as well as for a range of substrates like foils, paper and aluminium foils. The VARIOMAN, explains manroland web, fits in the production gap of medium-sized print runs. The special offset printing units have been developed with the cooperation partner Goebel GmbH.manroland web explains this press provides the combination of quality from the offset side, with the benefits of gravure printing in the areas of varnishing, adhesives and opaque white, which are important factors for modern packaging printing.
TRESU of Denmark introduced its FlexiPrint Reservoir SAVEink chamber doctor blade, described as a light, fast-change inking system for narrow-web UV and water-based flexo applications that can be used without an ink pump.TRESU explains the chambers are air-tight and prevent leakage based on patented seals, while they can be installed or removed safely in five seconds without the risk of spilling ink. To introduce the unit to its mounting, the operator locks it to the anilox roll, and rotates it from a six-o’clock to a nine-o’clock position. Removal reverses the process.The doctor blades are in a pre-set position, explains TRESU, and there is no need for further adjustment. The pre-set position provides optimal anilox contact with minimal wear. An automatic indicator shows when blade replacement is necessary, so time is not wasted on unnecessary checks.The chamber can hold 250 ml to 2,000 ml of ink making it suitable for the application of normal and spot colours, as well as high ink transfer printing. Ink may be added manually without stopping the press, giving the system flexibility for long and short-run production.Since the chambers are sealed, TRESU explains there is no risk of ink contamination and optimal pressure is maintained, to provide foam-free printing and an even ink coverage across the web. The chamber maintains precise inking even at the high speeds demanded by narrow-web printers, explains the company. Available in widths up to 800mm, the TRESU FlexiPrint Reservoir SAVEink chamber may be fitted to almost any narrow web press.
Nilpeter introduced a newly updated FA flexo press which the company describes as the most versatile flexo press on the market. It includes a new user interface and fully mobile print controls.
The FA press provides a strong level of stability, explains the company, with a tight register tolerance and quality printing on multiple substrates relative to the company's earlier versions. Based on Nilpeter’s Clean-Hand design approach, the FA provides clean hands during press operation, with a minimum of hands-on press interaction. The company also explains with the new press that all data is saved, jobs can be recalled, and the press will auto register.The new FA design allows printers to enhance the performance and capability of their press with Value-Adding Units, as well as Application and Automation Packages, according to needs and budget.
Israel-based Scodix announced beta testing for its Scodix E106 enhancement press is on schedule, after introducing the technology at drupa 2016 in May of last year. The press is aimed at the folding carton market and is now being used at CopyCenter, the largest folding carton printer in Israel. “The versatile Scodix E106 digital enhancement press is the perfect addition to our portfolio,” said Uri Drori CEO of CopyCenter. “The outstanding range of enhancements in a B1 format means we will be able to fulfill all our enhancement jobs on just one platform. “Also, working with high profile customers in the beauty category means that shelf appeal is critical to the products we produce,” continued Drori. “Digital technology will allow us to meet the ever-increasing demand for new applications including versioning and short runs that these products require.” The Scodix E106 made its debut at drupa 2016 to deliver enhancement solutions for folding carton converters who work with a 1,060 x 760-mm format. Scodix explains the technology provides converters ways to differentiate their offerings and a new standard in registration tolerance.“Printers and converters investing in the Scodix E106 will be able to offer short to medium run lengths profitably, offer new products, enter new markets and – fundamentally – clinch a competitive edge in tough market conditions with value-added services that truly energize brands,” said Roy Porat, CEO of Scodix. “At drupa 2016 we pledged that beta testing would be underway mid-2017 and we are delivering on that promise. This phase takes us a step closer a new standard in packaging enhancement.” The Scodix E106 press provides applications like Scodix Foil, Scodix Sense, Scodix Spot, Scodix Variable Data and Scodix Cast & Cure. The company explains it allows brand owners to create products using foil over foil, adding Scodix Sense effects over foil, or personalizing with Scodix Variable Data Sense or Scodix Variable Data Foil.
Esko's Studio software will now include integration with the 3D real-time rendering application KeyShot from Luxion. This solution provides the best of both worlds for brand owners and premedia: print modeling plus realistic, high-resolution rendering, in a short amount of time. All print modeling is done by Studio, while KeyShot handles non-printable materials and final renderings. Studio includes patented print modeling technology directly within Adobe Illustrator, making it easy to quickly decide on any number of print and finishing effects and packaging specific substrates. KeyShot provides drag-and-drop material, environment and lighting capabilities in a real-time interface to create high-quality visuals extremely fast for throughout the package development process. Luxion is a leading developer of advanced 3D rendering and lighting technology including applications such as KeyShot and the Velux Daylighting Visualizer. KeyShot is the first real-time ray tracing application that uses a physically correct render engine based on scientific research in global illumination and material appearance. With a focus on making the creation of high-quality visuals from 3D data as simple as taking a photograph, KeyShot is recognized as the standard visualization tool for industrial designers and marketing professionals worldwide. Luxion’s customer list includes many of the Fortune 1000 and major industrial design companies including Chrysler, Fossil, Microsoft, Philips, Specialized, Whirlpool, and IDEO. For more information on KeyShot 3D.
In May, Epson introduced its new SurePress L-6034VW, a UV-based label press for short- to mid-run jobs. The SurePress L-6034VW is Epson’s first single-pass industrial press, the first to use Epson’s PrecisionCore linehead technology, and the first to use Epson’s low migration LED UV curing ink. The company explains the L-6034VW is suitable across a range of industries, including health and beauty, nutraceuticals, and food and beverage, as well as standard consumer packaged goods. The SurePress L-4033AW is designed for prime label converters and commercial printers. It is a seven-colour inkjet digital label press with white ink that for working with clear and metallic substrates.
Mimaki announced the availability of its Tiger-1800B printing system in the Americas. The Tiger-1800B is described as a high-production inkjet printer capable of direct-to-textile or transfer dye sublimation output. It is designed to deliver both large-scale production at manufacturing sites and small-scale production at on-demand sites, explains Mimaki, making it well suited for digital textile applications.The 74.8-inch Tiger-1800B includes an adhesive belt transport system with belt washing technology and in-line heat drying unit for what Mimaki describes as an all-in-one process for direct-to-textile printing.For high-volume production, it features 16 print heads in a staggered array for the direct-to-textile model, or 8 print heads for the transfer dye sublimation model, resulting in print speeds of up to 4,144 square feet per hour. Usable quality can be achieved even at these high print speeds to meet volume demands, explains Mimaki, or to quickly produce shorter-run projects such as for regional or seasonal fashion requirements.Its print speeds are supported by what the company describes as a sophisticated textile transport system, achieved through twin pressure roller shafts attached to the edge of the transportation belt. Textiles are transported onto the belt through the rollers. Wrinkle and Media Jam sensors detect textile wrinkling or creasing early in order to minimize potential damage to the print heads from collisions with raised or jammed textiles.As previously mentioned, the Tiger’s belt washing mechanism prevents stains on fresh fabric from ink remaining on the belt. It is equipped with two squeegees to prevent splash-back, and two heaters to dry and re-activate the belt surface. A cleaning liquid is automatically applied to each wiper before and after head cleaning. This liquid enhances the head cleaning process, explains Mimaki, and reduces daily maintenance time by providing a clean wiper.The Tiger-1800B printer features Variable Dot Printing and a standard Degassing Module reduces clogging by removing air bubbles in the ink, and an Ink Circulation ensures stable ink supply by constantly circulating the ink.Options for the direct-to-textile model include: a Roll Media Centering Unit featuring a feeding unit with a centering device and tension bar; a Jumbo Roll Unit; a Plaited Unit; and a Drying and Take-Up Unit for high density printed fabrics. The dye sublimation model includes the Jumbo Roll Unit as a standard feature.
Introduced in January 2018, OKI explains its Pro8432WT produces HD-quality colour transfers for textile and hard substrates, up to 11 x 17 inch format, as well as promotional materials. To this end, it leverages a straight paper path for flexible media handling. The printer features white toner technology with solid opacity and CMY colour. It can handle transfers for 100 percent cotton, cotton blends or polyester. Running at nine pages per minute for tabloid-size full-colour transfer, or 16 ppm for letter-size, reaching 1,200-dpi resolution. OKI explains its digital transfers, unlike sublimation do not require, do not require specially coated substrates. They rransfers onto black, white or coloured textile or hard surface substrates.
Epson in January introduced its SureColor F2100 direct-to-garment system, which will be available in March 2018. Leveraging an Epson PrecisionCore TFP print head and Epson UltraChrome DG garment ink technology, the SureColor F2100 achieves up to twice the speed of the company’s previous generation DTG printer – the SureColor F2000. The SureColor F2100 (MSRP US$17,995) offers four colour ink technology, plus White ink. Additional improvements on the new SureColor F2100 include a quick-load platen, Epson Garment Creator Software, all-new integrated self-cleaning system for less downtime, and newly developed print modes including Light Garment Mode and Highlight White. Epson explains these new modes provide for more consistent print quality. “The SureColor F2000 is the number-one selling direct-to-garment printer in the market and has helped customers increase efficiency on short-run orders and expand product service offerings,” said Tim Check, senior product manager, Professional Imaging, Epson America. “We listened to our customers and addressed common direct-to-garment pain points with the new SureColor F2100.” In terms of the new integrated inline self-cleaning system, the SureColor F2100 transports cleaning solution through the printhead, allowing the printer to perform daily maintenance to reduce downtime. In addition, White ink is triple filtered before reaching the printhead, designed to help reduce White ink nozzle clogging for greater up-time and reliability. Epson explains the new Highlight White mode achieves brighter White ink output by applying a second coat of White ink, while simultaneously printing colour ink for improved print speeds. With a new garment grip pad, the SureColor F2100 allows users to quickly load and unload garments on the printer platen to help reduce traditional hoop platen load times.
Ricoh, during the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, introduced a new “ultra-affordable” Direct to Garment (DTG) printer, called the Ri 100, which the company expects to make a major impact with a variety of small businesses, municipalities and other organizations. The Ricoh Ri 100 was announced as a CES 2018 Innovation Awards Honoree, as judged by a panel of independent industrial designers, independent engineers and members of the trade media, across 28 product categories. “Customers have been asking for an affordable, low risk entry point into the DTG market, and our team is the first in the market to deliver on that,” said John Fulena, Vice President, Commercial and Industrial Printing Group, Ricoh USA.The company describes it as a great fit for souvenir shops and other businesses looking to leverage the impact of branded t-shirts, canvas bags, pillows and other fabrics. The Ri 100 features ready-to-go drivers and design software alongside what Ricoh describes as an intuitive heating unit for prepress wrinkle-smoothing and post-press ink curing. Leveraging technology from Ricoh and AnaJet, a Ricoh company, the Ri 100 prints at up to 1,200 x 1,200 dpi in vivid mode using Ricoh’s print heads with modular drop-sizes.The system is designed so users can start producing DTG applications right out of the box with minimal to no training. It can fit on counters or desks, so it can be added to a business without existing dedicated space for printing equipment. The total package (Ri 100, heating unit, software and accessories) is planned to retail for less than US$5,000, which Ricoh describes as a price that is significantly lower than that of traditional DTG printers.
At IPEX, which began today at the ExCel International Centre in London, UK, Ricoh is launching a new Direct to Garment printer and Neon Pink toner for its Pro C7110sx press. IPEX is the formal public launch event for these new product additions.The Ri 6000 direct to garment printer, explains Ricoh, is ideally suited to commercial printers looking to expand their service with entry-level systems. Suited to garments like t-shirts, sweatshirts, socks and bags, the Ricoh Ri 6000 can print on cotton-polyester blends and ideally on 100 percent cotton fabrics. The Pro C7110sx will be displaying its fifth colour capability enhanced by the recent launch of the new neon pink colour option, which joins white or clear options.In early October, Ricoh also unveiled a new wide-format flatbed printer called the Pro T7210. “The business model for décor printing is evolving with increased demand for shorter runs and faster delivery times for custom and small-batch wall coverings, flooring, furniture and tile,” said John Fulena, VP, Commercial & Industrial Printing Business Group, Ricoh USA. “The T7210 gives printers the ability to do all of that, and it makes doing it easy, and effective.”The T7210 supports substrates up to 4.3 inches thick with a print size of 6.9 feet by 10.5 feet. It prints at speeds of 50 square metres per hour (538.2 feet), during standard operation. Additionally, a media gap adjustment sensor automatically measures substrate thickness and adjusts print heads accordingly.
Mimaki has commercially released its TX500P-3200DS machine, described by the company as a complete digital fabric printing system. The 3.2-metre-wide direct-to-textile printer features an in-line colour fixation unit for soft signage, exhibit graphics, and décor applications. The TX500P-3200DS printer will be on display at the upcoming International Sign Expo, April 20-22, in Las Vegas.Direct to fabric dye sublimation printing requires fixation of inks through a dry heat process, a step that is traditionally performed separately. The TX500P-3200DS printer, explains Mimaki, utilizes an inline colour fixation unit to optimize the printing and finishing process by enabling simultaneous printing and colour fixation, thereby reducing two steps to one in a single device. Additionally, the TX500P-3200DS printer provides efficient finishing by linking the printer and the heater units. This enables synchronization, explains Mimaki, so that the printer is initiated when the heater reaches the optimum fixation temperature. Mimaki states this feature helps to control cost by reducing production time, labour, and transfer-related waste.The TX500P-3200DS printer includes new print heads that enable printing directly onto various types of textiles. The high gap setting, explains Mimaki, gives users the ability to print on thin and thick textiles, plus woven patterns or raised fiber surfaces.The 12 print heads are arranged in a staggered array and provide a range of printing modes from high-speed draft (1,399 square feet per hour) to high quality (538 square feet per hour).An Auto Media Feeder (AMF) and a pulling roller provide consistent feeding of fabric by automatically applying the appropriate tension to the fabric during conveyance.The system also includes waveform control, whereby each ink colour has its own specific gravity and viscosity. To achieve placement of the ink droplets onto the media, Mimaki designed a waveform control that enables the printhead to jet each ink colour at the appropriate jetting angle while maintaining ink droplet circularity. The system provides variable ink droplet sizes – small, medium and large – and Mimaki Advanced Pass System 4 (MAPS4). This technology incorporates an advanced algorithm that reduces banding, uneven ink drying and bi-directional.
The Xerox Direct to Object Printer, which is a customized solution built to order, allows for printing photos, images and text directly onto 3D Objects in just a few minutes. The technology, which can be aimed at on-demand personalization, relies on Xerox print head nozzles that are half the width of a human hair.The print head nozzles, explains Xerox, can accurately spray ink on objects as small as bottle caps and as large as football helmets. The printer can print on plastic, metals, ceramics and glass, eliminating the need for costly labels. “This innovation opens up a path for creating customized products instantly at a time when the consumer’s appetite is all about personalization,” said Brendan Casey, VP of Xerox Engineering Services. “Imagine a sports fan coming home from a game with a helmet or ball that was personalized right at the stadium, or a retailer offering on-demand personalization on hundreds of different store items.” Xerox explains it uses enhanced image-quality algorithms to direct the microscopic nozzles half the width of a human hair. By accurately spraying ink at distances of one-quarter inch, the printer is able to print on smooth, rough, slightly curved or stepped surfaces at print resolutions ranging from 300 to 1,200 dpi. The printer can handle up to 30 objects per hour, with the ability to scale for production. “The real innovation here is that we can now print on items, such as steel water bottles with multiple curves, without the setup time and costs that analog printing such as flexography or screen printing require,” said Wayne Buchar, Chief Engineer, Xerox Engineering Services. Xerox explains the ink jets are compatible with virtually any type of ink chemistry including solvent, aqueous and UV inks and can be operated at temperatures as high as 140°C, enabling jetting of specialized inks that meet demanding requirements. As well, the architecture of the Direct To Object printer features a flexible design for holders so that objects can be changed out easily.
International Data Corporation (IDC) released a new report, called The Worldwide Semiannual 3D Printing Spending Guide, which forecasts global revenues for the 3D printing market to reach US$35.4 billion in 2020. This is more than double the US$15.9 billion in revenues forecast for 2016 and represents a compound annual growth of 24.1 percent over the 2015-2020 forecast period.3D printers and materials will represent nearly half the total worldwide revenues throughout the forecast, according to IDC, with software and related services also expected to experience significant growth. Revenues for computer-aided design (CAD) software are forecast to triple over the five-year forecast period while the market for on-demand parts services will nearly match this growth. IDC explains the gains in both software and on-demand parts printing are being driven by the rapidly expanding use of 3D printing for design prototyping and products that require a high degree of customization in non-traditional environments.The use cases that will generate the largest revenues for 3D printing in 2016, according to IDC, are Automotive Design, Rapid Prototype Printing (more than US$4.0 billion) and Aerospace and Defense Parts Printing (nearly US$2.4 billion). IDC explains Dental Printing has also emerged as a strong opportunity in 2016.“Customer spending on 3D printing capabilities is following the market away from mass market consumer printers towards holistic solutions that enable higher-end – and more profitable – use cases,” said Christopher Chute, VP, Customer Insights and Analysis, IDC. “As the market for printers, materials and services matures, IDC expects new 3D printing capabilities to enable a next-wave of customer innovation in discrete manufacturing, product design, and life sciences.”IDC continues to explain that given the increased use of 3D printing for prototyping and parts production, it comes as no surprise that discrete manufacturing will continue to be the leading industry, generating 56 percent of worldwide 3D printing revenues in 2016. “IDC expects the worldwide 3D printing market to continue its rapid expansion over the next several years, driven by the need to reduce manufacturing cycle times and to reduce prototyping costs,” said Keith Kmetz, VP of IDC's Imaging, Printing and Document Solutions research. “This growth will be fueled by an explosion of 3D printer manufacturers from around the world, seeking to capitalize on the anticipated growth in this market with faster printers that offer better quality output at lower prices.”Healthcare and professional services will remain the second and third largest industries, according to the new report released on August 12, in terms revenues over the 2015-2020 forecast period, while retail will experience the greatest revenue growth, vaulting into the fourth position by 2020. Meanwhile, IDC predicts revenues from consumer 3D printing will grow modestly as this market has already matured.The Worldwide Semiannual 3D Printing Spending Guide by includes revenue data available for more than 20 use cases across 20 industries in eight regions. Data is also available for 3D printing hardware, materials, software, and services.
Fujifilm Dimatix unveiled the new Dimatix Material Printer DMP-2850 aimed at printed electronics, displays, and similar applications. The product, to be available from September 2016, with enhanced user applications coming in the first quarter of 2017, is an enhanced version of the company’s deposition research platform, the DMP-2831. Launched more than 10 years ago, the DMP-2831 is a laboratory tool for the development of inkjet deposition fluids and processes, with approximately 1,000 units placed worldwide in academic and industrial facilities. The DMP-2850 includes an embedded 64-bit PC preconfigured with Microsoft Windows 8.1 and updated Drop Manager software. Two high-speed cameras with finer resolution optics provide superior images for drop-watching and print inspection functions. To accompany the hardware changes, the DMP-2850 will build on user accessibility and flexibility with an enhanced software platform. Remote access API and open architecture enable remote monitoring of cameras and printer status. More options for complex printing will be available with feature recognition, auto registration functions, and support for multi-layer printing. Jetting evaluation and drop watching operations will also benefit from automated analysis.
Ultimaker, a 3D printer manufacturer in The Netherlands, signed a sales and service agreement with Shop3D to distribute its technologies in Canada. Shop3D offers the Canadian technology market a selection of products for sale, as well as personalized design and printing services. Online purchases can now be made in the official Canadian Ultimaker Web store and consumers can also visit the Shop3D showroom in Brampton, Ontario, where consumers can purchase the Ultimaker Original+, Ultimaker 2, Ultimaker 2 Go, Ultimaker 2 Extended, Ultimaker Filaments, Add-Ons and Spare Parts from Shop3D.“With the growing interest in 3D printing in Canada we realize more and more how suitable our 3D printing is for this territory – great service and local support are of the utmost importance here,” said Siert Wijnia, founder and CTO of Ultimaker. “It is therefore important that we select the right local partners. We have full confidence that, together with Shop3D, we will be very successful in Canada.”Ultimaker focuses on producing products that make 3D printing accessible to all, with desktop printer models that based on open source programming. “Canada has always been a central hub for creativity and avant garde thinking. A mentality that fits perfectly with the Ultimaker community,” said Kenneth Wan, CEO of Shop3D. “As such, Shop3D is delighted to form this new partnership with Ultimaker so that Canadian engineers, designers and makers have access to the best 3D printers on the market paired with unbeatable local support without cross border hassle.”
The Canadian Printable Electronics Industry Association and PAC, Packaging Consortium, have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to explore how printable and organic electronics can help Canada’s packaging industry. This is a non-financial commitment between the two organizations to collaborate on a number of initiatives over the next two years.“This partnership with PAC is a tremendous stride forward in our commitment to our members, to forge the linkages that will help them create compelling new products and applications that meet the pressing needs of key end users,” said Peter Kallai, Executive Director of Canadian Printable Electronics Industry Association (CPEIA).PAC explains its 2,200 members come from all sectors of the packaging industry, including retailers, consumer brands, package manufacturers and services, waste management and government. The association explains printable and organic electronics are providing new ways to manage inventory, track shipped items, better maintain product freshness, monitor medication usage, identify packing materials for re-cycling, and turn consumer packaging into an interactive platform.PAC continues to explain its collaboration with CPEIA includes a priority to address waste. For example, the association explains, a third of the world’s food goes to waste. The PAC Food Waste initiative is investigating waste in the supply chain and looking at ways to extend product shelf life through innovations in packaging. PAC NEXT, meanwhile, is looking at ways to identify sustainable solutions that can lead to zero packaging waste.“A key aspect of our mandate is to drive progressive change in the packaging value chain through leadership, collaboration and knowledge sharing,” said James D. Downham, President and CEO of PAC. “Intelligent packaging enabled by printable electronics could drive one of the greatest advances to reduce waste in the packaging industry since the widespread adoption of recycling programs.”
HP, after a long expectation based on its decades of inkjet printing and materials sciences development, has officially entered the 3D Printing space with the introduction of Multi Jet Fusion system. While the technology is available today through a partner program, HP expects to begin wider distribution of its 3D print systems in 2016. Built on HP Thermal Inkjet technology, Multi Jet Fusion, according to the company, features a unique synchronous architecture to address the commercial viability of 3D printing. HP states Multi Jet Fusion is 10 times faster than the fastest technology in market today based on its ability to image entire surface areas versus one point at a time. The company’s proprietary multi-agent printing process, utilizing HP Thermal Inkjet arrays, simultaneously apply multiple liquid agents that combines accuracy, resiliency and uniform part strength in all three axis directions. The company also explains Multi Jet Fusion is able to manipulate part and material properties, including form, texture, friction, strength, elasticity, electrical, thermal properties and more – well beyond other 3D print processes.   HP has also started the HP Open Customer Engagement Program to work with users to extend the capabilities of the HP 3D Print platform, which will include a certification process for partners to drive materials innovation.   HP also introduced its vision for the future of computing and 3D printing by unveiling its new Blended Reality ecosystem. This ecosystem is underpinned by two key advancements, including Multi Jet Fusion and what the company calls Sprout by HP. Sprout is described as a first-of-its-kind Immersive Computing platform that combines an advanced desktop computer with an immersive, natural user interface. “We live in a 3D world, but today we create in a 2D world on existing devices,” said Ron Coughlin, Senior VP, Consumer PC & Solutions, HP. "Sprout by HP is a big step forward in reimagining the boundaries of how we create and engage with technology to allow users to move seamlessly from thought to expression." Combining a scanner, depth sensor, hi-resolution camera and projector into a single device, Sprout by HP allows users to take physical items and merge them into a digital workspace. “We are on the cusp of a transformative era in computing and printing,” said Dion Weisler, Executive VP, Printing & Personal Systems, HP. "Our ability to deliver Blended Reality technologies will reduce the barriers between the digital and physical worlds, enabling us to express ourselves at the speed of thought – without filters, without limitations.”
Toronto-focused urban site BlogTO has highlighted Toronto’s Letterpress printing scene with a short list of the city’s printers.“Since the dawn of the internet, geek chic has reigned, so it makes sense that a love for typography would resurface,” writes post author Sarah Ratchford, “Combine that with the maker/DIY takeover, and you've got yourself a town full of folks seeking out letterpress printers.”The list includes Trip Print Press, previously profiled by PrintAction in October 2006 and five others. The posting also solicits readers to contribute other letterpress operations in their comments section.Read the full post here.
In the age of computerization, where metal type in China has been falling in popularity, there are a few who are working hard to save the cultural asset.The Associated Press has published a profile on Chang Chieh-kuan, one of the few remaining lead-type printers in China and Taiwan. "Lead type makes an impression on paper that digital printing cannot," says Chang. "It allows people to feel the weight and power of the character."Taipei once had 5,000 printing shops in the 1960s, but today only 30 old-style establishments remain. Chang's company, Ri Xing Type Foundry, is the last print foundry in the capital and hasn't turned a profit in 10 years. "If I can't save this business ... it would be a big loss for Taiwan," Chang said. "As for humanity, the Chinese-character movable letterpress is a huge cultural asset and could very well disappear."Read the full story here.

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